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Article

Development and Implementation of a Total Worker Health® Mentoring Program in a Correctional Workforce

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Department of Health Sciences, Springfield College, Springfield, MA 01109, USA
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Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, University of Connecticut Health Center, Farmington, CT 06030, USA
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Department of Psychological Sciences, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT 06269, USA
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Susan and Alan Solomont School of Nursing, University of Massachusetts Lowell, Lowell, MA 01854, USA
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Sara L. Tamers, L. Casey Chosewood and Jessica Streit
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(16), 8712; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18168712
Received: 21 June 2021 / Revised: 13 August 2021 / Accepted: 14 August 2021 / Published: 18 August 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Worker Safety, Health, and Well-Being in the USA)
Correctional officers (COs) are exposed to a number of occupational stressors, and their health declines early in their job tenure. Interventions designed to prevent early decline in CO health are limited. This article describes the development, implementation, and evaluation of a one-year peer health mentoring program (HMP) guided by Total Worker Health® principles and using a participatory action research to collectively address worker safety, health, and well-being of newly hired COs. The HMP aimed to provide new COs with emotional and tangible forms of support during their first year of employment, including peer coaching to prevent early decline in physical fitness and health. The development and implementation of the HMP occurred across five main steps: (1) participatory design focus groups with key stakeholders; (2) adaptation of an existing mentoring handbook and training methods; (3) development of mentor–mentee recruitment criteria and assignment; (4) designing assessment tools; and (5) the initiation of a mentor oversight committee consisting of union leadership, corrections management, and research staff. Correctional employee engagement in the design and implementation process proved to be efficacious in the implementation and adaptation of the program by staff. Support for the HMP remained high as program evaluation efforts continued. View Full-Text
Keywords: total worker health; correctional workforce; health mentoring; workplace wellness; occupational safety total worker health; correctional workforce; health mentoring; workplace wellness; occupational safety
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MDPI and ACS Style

Namazi, S.; Kotejoshyer, R.; Farr, D.; Henning, R.A.; Tubbs, D.C.; Dugan, A.G.; El Ghaziri, M.; Cherniack, M. Development and Implementation of a Total Worker Health® Mentoring Program in a Correctional Workforce. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 8712. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18168712

AMA Style

Namazi S, Kotejoshyer R, Farr D, Henning RA, Tubbs DC, Dugan AG, El Ghaziri M, Cherniack M. Development and Implementation of a Total Worker Health® Mentoring Program in a Correctional Workforce. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2021; 18(16):8712. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18168712

Chicago/Turabian Style

Namazi, Sara, Rajashree Kotejoshyer, Dana Farr, Robert A. Henning, Diana C. Tubbs, Alicia G. Dugan, Mazen El Ghaziri, and Martin Cherniack. 2021. "Development and Implementation of a Total Worker Health® Mentoring Program in a Correctional Workforce" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 18, no. 16: 8712. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18168712

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