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Article

Racial Residential Segregation and Race Differences in Ideal Cardiovascular Health among Young Men

1
Department of Public Health Sciences, Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29634, USA
2
Department of Pediatrics, Duke University School of Medicine, Duke University, Durham, NC 27710, USA
3
Department of Health Policy and Management, Gillings School of Global Public Health, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, SC 27599, USA
4
Hopkins Center for Health Disparities Solutions, Program for Research on Men’s Health, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA
5
Department of Population Health Sciences, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, NC 27710, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Kiarri N. Kershaw, Sandra Albrecht and Tiffany M. Powell-Wiley
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(15), 7755; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18157755
Received: 10 June 2021 / Revised: 7 July 2021 / Accepted: 14 July 2021 / Published: 22 July 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Neighborhoods and Cardiovascular Risk)
Background: Race disparities in cardiovascular disease (CVD) related morbidity and mortality are evident among men. While previous studies show health in young adulthood and racial residential segregation (RRS) are important factors for CVD risk, these factors have not been widely studied in male populations. We sought to examine race differences in ideal cardiovascular health (CVH) among young men (ages 24–34) and whether RRS influenced this association. Methods: We used cross-sectional data from young men who participated in Wave IV (2008) of the National Longitudinal Survey of Adolescent to Adult Health (N = 5080). The dichotomous outcome, achieving ideal CVH, was defined as having ≥4 of the American Heart Association’s Life’s Simple 7 targets. Race (Black/White) and RRS (proportion of White residents in census tract) were the independent variables. Descriptive and multivariate analyses were conducted. Results: Young Black men had lower odds of achieving ideal CVH (OR = 0.67, 95% CI = 0.49, 0.92) than young White men. However, RRS did not have a significant effect on race differences in ideal CVH until the proportion of White residents was ≥55%. Conclusions: Among young Black and White men, RRS is an important factor to consider when seeking to understand CVH and reduce future cardiovascular risk. View Full-Text
Keywords: cardiovascular health; residential segregation; health disparities; young adulthood cardiovascular health; residential segregation; health disparities; young adulthood
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MDPI and ACS Style

Baxter, S.L.K.; Chung, R.; Frerichs, L.; Thorpe, R.J., Jr.; Skinner, A.C.; Weinberger, M. Racial Residential Segregation and Race Differences in Ideal Cardiovascular Health among Young Men. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 7755. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18157755

AMA Style

Baxter SLK, Chung R, Frerichs L, Thorpe RJ Jr., Skinner AC, Weinberger M. Racial Residential Segregation and Race Differences in Ideal Cardiovascular Health among Young Men. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2021; 18(15):7755. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18157755

Chicago/Turabian Style

Baxter, Samuel L.K., Richard Chung, Leah Frerichs, Roland J. Thorpe Jr., Asheley C. Skinner, and Morris Weinberger. 2021. "Racial Residential Segregation and Race Differences in Ideal Cardiovascular Health among Young Men" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 18, no. 15: 7755. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18157755

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