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Article

Using Co-Production to Develop “Sit Less at Work” Interventions in a Range of Organisations

1
School of Health and Related Research, University of Sheffield, Regent Street, Sheffield S1 4DA, UK
2
Department of Psychology, University of Sheffield, Cathedral Court, 1 Vicar Lane, Sheffield S1 2LT, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Evangelia Demou, Maria Karanika-Murray, Vaughan Parsons, Elaine Wainwright and Mark A. Tully
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(15), 7751; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18157751
Received: 28 May 2021 / Revised: 2 July 2021 / Accepted: 20 July 2021 / Published: 22 July 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Development and Evaluation of Workplace Interventions)
Prolonged periods of sitting are associated with negative health outcomes, so the increase in sedentary jobs is a public health concern. Evaluation of interventions to reduce workplace sitting have suggested that participatory approaches may be more effective. This paper describes the use of co-production in four diverse organisations. Workshops with staff in each organisation were conducted to develop an organisation-specific strategy. The first workshop involved creative activities to encourage participants to develop innovative suggestions. The second workshop then developed a feasible and acceptable action plan. An ecological approach was used to consider behaviour change determinants at a range of different levels including intrapersonal, interpersonal, organisational, and environmental-level factors. 41 staff volunteered for workshops (seven in a small business, 16 in a charity, 15 in a local authority, and three in a large corporation). Of those, 27 were able to attend the first workshops and 16 were able to attend the second. Whilst there were some similarities across organisations, the smaller organisations developed a more tailored and innovative strategy than large organisations where there were more barriers to change and a more diverse workforce. Co-production resulted in bespoke interventions, tailored for different organisational contexts, maximising their potential feasibility and acceptability. View Full-Text
Keywords: sitting time; sedentary; occupational; workplace; intervention development; co-production sitting time; sedentary; occupational; workplace; intervention development; co-production
MDPI and ACS Style

Mackenzie, K.; Such, E.; Norman, P.; Goyder, E. Using Co-Production to Develop “Sit Less at Work” Interventions in a Range of Organisations. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 7751. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18157751

AMA Style

Mackenzie K, Such E, Norman P, Goyder E. Using Co-Production to Develop “Sit Less at Work” Interventions in a Range of Organisations. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2021; 18(15):7751. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18157751

Chicago/Turabian Style

Mackenzie, Kelly, Elizabeth Such, Paul Norman, and Elizabeth Goyder. 2021. "Using Co-Production to Develop “Sit Less at Work” Interventions in a Range of Organisations" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 18, no. 15: 7751. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18157751

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