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Article

A Qualitative Exploration of Addiction Disclosure and Stigma among Faculty Members in a Canadian University Context

Faculty of Social Work, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB T2E 1M2, Canada
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Michael Leiter, Miguel Ángel Santed, Santiago Gascón, Maria José Chambel and Steve Sussman
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(14), 7274; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18147274
Received: 3 May 2021 / Revised: 8 June 2021 / Accepted: 29 June 2021 / Published: 7 July 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Psychosocial Factors and Health at Work: Evaluation and Intervention)
Addiction is one of the most stigmatized public health issues, which serves to silence individuals who need help. Despite emerging global interest in workplace mental health and addiction, scholarship examining addiction among university faculty members (FMs) is lacking, particularly in a Canadian context. Using a Communication Privacy Management (CPM) framework and semi-structured interviews with key informants (deans and campus mental health professionals), this qualitative study aimed to answer the following research questions: (1) What is the experience of key informants who encounter FM addiction? (2) How may addiction stigma affect FM disclosure and help-seeking? and (3) What may help reduce addiction stigma for FMs? Thematic analysis was used to identify three main themes: (1) Disclosure was rare, and most often involved alcohol; (2) Addiction stigma and non-disclosure were reported to be affected by university alcohol and productivity cultures, faculty type, and gender; (3) Reducing addiction stigma may involve peer support, vulnerable leadership (e.g., openly sharing addiction-recovery stories), and non-discriminatory protective policies. This study offers novel insights into how addiction stigma may operate for FMs in relation to university-specific norms (e.g., drinking and productivity culture), and outlines some recommendations for creating more recovery-friendly campuses. View Full-Text
Keywords: addiction; alcohol; stigma; disclosure; university faculty; help-seeking; workplace addiction; alcohol; stigma; disclosure; university faculty; help-seeking; workplace
MDPI and ACS Style

Burns, V.F.; Walsh, C.A.; Smith, J. A Qualitative Exploration of Addiction Disclosure and Stigma among Faculty Members in a Canadian University Context. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 7274. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18147274

AMA Style

Burns VF, Walsh CA, Smith J. A Qualitative Exploration of Addiction Disclosure and Stigma among Faculty Members in a Canadian University Context. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2021; 18(14):7274. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18147274

Chicago/Turabian Style

Burns, Victoria F., Christine A. Walsh, and Jacqueline Smith. 2021. "A Qualitative Exploration of Addiction Disclosure and Stigma among Faculty Members in a Canadian University Context" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 18, no. 14: 7274. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18147274

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