Next Article in Journal
Addictive Internet Gaming Usage among Korean Adolescents before and after the Outbreak of the COVID-19 Pandemic: A Comparison of the Latent Profiles in 2018 and 2020
Previous Article in Journal
A Qualitative Exploration of Addiction Disclosure and Stigma among Faculty Members in a Canadian University Context
Article

COVID-19 Pandemic Related Research in Africa: Bibliometric Analysis of Scholarly Output, Collaborations and Scientific Leadership

1
UFR IM2AG, Université Grenoble Alpes, 38000 Grenoble, France
2
Laboratory for Industrial and Applied Mathematics (LIAM), Department of Mathematics and Statistics, York University, Toronto, ON M3J 1P3, Canada
3
Graduate School of Medicine, University of Tohoku, Sendai 980-8575, Japan
4
Chantal BIYA International Reference Centre for Research on HIV/AIDS Prevention and Management (CIRCB), Yaoundé 3077, Cameroon
5
Graduate School of Life Sciences, University of Tohoku, Sendai 980-8577, Japan
6
Canadian Centre for Disease Modelling (CCDM), Department of Mathematics and Statistics, York University, Toronto, ON M3J 1P3, Canada
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Equally contributed as first authors.
Academic Editor: Paul B. Tchounwou
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(14), 7273; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18147273
Received: 2 May 2021 / Revised: 25 June 2021 / Accepted: 29 June 2021 / Published: 7 July 2021
Scientometrics enables scholars to assess and visualize emerging research trends and hot-spots in the scientific literature from a quantitative standpoint. In the last decades, Africa has nearly doubled its absolute count of scholarly output, even though its share in global knowledge production has dramatically decreased. The still-ongoing COVID-19 pandemic has profoundly impacted the way scholarly research is conducted, published, and disseminated. However, the COVID-19-related research focus, the scientific productivity, and the research collaborative network of African researchers during the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic remain to be elucidated. This study aimed to clarify the COVID-19 research patterns among African researchers and estimate the strength of collaborations and partnerships between African researchers and scholars from the rest of the world during the COVID-19 pandemic, collecting data from electronic scholarly databases such as Web of Science (WoS), PubMed/MEDLINE and African Journals OnLine (AJOL), the largest and prominent platform of African-published scholarly journals. We found that COVID-19-related collaboration patterns varied among African regions. For instance, most of the scholarly partnerships occurred with formerly colonial countries (such as European or North-American countries). In other cases, scholarly ties of North African countries were above all with the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. In terms of number of publications, South Africa and Egypt were among the most productive countries. Bibliometrics and, in particular, scientometrics can help scholars identify research areas of particular interest, as well as emerging topics, such as the COVID-19 pandemic. With a specific focus on the still-ongoing viral outbreak, they can assist decision- and policy-makers in allocating funding and economic-financial, logistic, organizational, and human resources, based on the specific gaps and needs of a given country or research area. View Full-Text
Keywords: bibliometrics; scientometrics; Africa; COVID-19 pandemic bibliometrics; scientometrics; Africa; COVID-19 pandemic
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Mbogning Fonkou, M.D.; Bragazzi, N.L.; Tsinda, E.K.; Bouba, Y.; Mmbando, G.S.; Kong, J.D. COVID-19 Pandemic Related Research in Africa: Bibliometric Analysis of Scholarly Output, Collaborations and Scientific Leadership. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 7273. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18147273

AMA Style

Mbogning Fonkou MD, Bragazzi NL, Tsinda EK, Bouba Y, Mmbando GS, Kong JD. COVID-19 Pandemic Related Research in Africa: Bibliometric Analysis of Scholarly Output, Collaborations and Scientific Leadership. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2021; 18(14):7273. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18147273

Chicago/Turabian Style

Mbogning Fonkou, Maxime D., Nicola L. Bragazzi, Emmanuel K. Tsinda, Yagai Bouba, Gideon S. Mmbando, and Jude D. Kong. 2021. "COVID-19 Pandemic Related Research in Africa: Bibliometric Analysis of Scholarly Output, Collaborations and Scientific Leadership" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 18, no. 14: 7273. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18147273

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop