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Article

Estimated Prevalence of Unreported IGD Cases in Routine Outpatient Children and Adolescent Psychotherapy

1
Institute of Psychology, Goethe University Frankfurt, 60323 Frankfurt am Main, Germany
2
Centre for Psychological Psychotherapy Heidelberg, Heidelberg University, 69115 Heidelberg, Germany
3
Department of Psychology, Faculty of Human Sciences, MSH Medical School Hamburg, 20457 Hamburg, Germany
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Manuel J. Ruiz Muñoz, Sergio Fernández-Artamendi and Carla López-Nuñez
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(13), 6787; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18136787
Received: 16 April 2021 / Revised: 18 June 2021 / Accepted: 22 June 2021 / Published: 24 June 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Addictive Behaviors and Mental Health in Adolescents and Young Adults)
Internet Gaming Disorder (IGD) has been included in the DSM-5 as a diagnosis for further study, and Gaming Disorder as a new diagnosis in the ICD-11. Nonetheless, little is known about the clinical prevalence of IGD in children and adolescents. Additionally, it is unclear if patients with IGD are already identified in routine psychotherapy, using the ICD-10 diagnosis F 63.8 (recommended classification of IGD in ICD-10). This study investigated N = 358 children and adolescents (self and parental rating) of an outpatient psychotherapy centre in Germany using the Video Game Dependency Scale. According to self-report 4.0% of the 11- to 17-year-old patients met criteria for a tentative IGD diagnosis and 14.0% according to the parental report. Of the 5- to 10-year-old patients, 4.1% were diagnosed with tentative IGD according to parental report. Patients meeting IGD criteria were most frequently diagnosed with hyperkinetic disorders, followed by anxiety disorders, F 63.8, conduct disorders, mood disorders and obsessive-compulsive disorders (descending order) as primary clinical diagnoses. Consequently, this study indicates that a significant amount of the clinical population presents IGD. Meaning, appropriate diagnostics should be included in routine psychological diagnostics in order to avoid “hidden” cases of IGD in the future. View Full-Text
Keywords: Internet Gaming Disorder; prevalence; children; adolescents; clinical diagnoses; clinical sample; comorbidities; F 63.8 Internet Gaming Disorder; prevalence; children; adolescents; clinical diagnoses; clinical sample; comorbidities; F 63.8
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MDPI and ACS Style

Kewitz, S.; Vonderlin, E.; Wartberg, L.; Lindenberg, K. Estimated Prevalence of Unreported IGD Cases in Routine Outpatient Children and Adolescent Psychotherapy. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 6787. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18136787

AMA Style

Kewitz S, Vonderlin E, Wartberg L, Lindenberg K. Estimated Prevalence of Unreported IGD Cases in Routine Outpatient Children and Adolescent Psychotherapy. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2021; 18(13):6787. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18136787

Chicago/Turabian Style

Kewitz, Sonja, Eva Vonderlin, Lutz Wartberg, and Katajun Lindenberg. 2021. "Estimated Prevalence of Unreported IGD Cases in Routine Outpatient Children and Adolescent Psychotherapy" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 18, no. 13: 6787. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18136787

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