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Open AccessArticle

Temperamental Constellations and School Readiness: A MultiVariate Approach

1
Department of Educational Psychology, University of Nebraska–Lincoln, Lincoln, NE 68588, USA
2
PSI Services LLC, Glendale, CA 91203, USA
3
School of Education, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA 23284, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(1), 55; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18010055
Received: 30 November 2020 / Revised: 15 December 2020 / Accepted: 21 December 2020 / Published: 23 December 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Mental Health of Child and Young People)
This study uses canonical correlation analyses to explore the relationship between multiple predictors of school readiness (i.e., academic readiness, social readiness, and teacher-child relationship) and multiple temperamental traits using data from the second wave (age 54 months, n = 1226) of the longitudinal Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development (SECCYD; NICHD ECCRN 1993). This longitudinal study collected data on a large cohort of children and their families from birth through age 15. For academic readiness, only one temperamental constellation emerged, representing the construct of effortful control (i.e., high attentional focusing, high inhibitory control). For peer interactions, two significant constellations emerged: “dysregulated” (low inhibitory control, low shyness, and high activity), and “withdrawn” (high shyness, low inhibitory control, low attentional focusing). Finally, the analyses exploring child-teacher relationships revealed two significant constellations: “highly surgent” (high activity, low inhibitory control, low shyness) and “emotionally controlled” (low anger/frustration and high inhibitory control). Results of this study form a more nuanced exploration of relationships between temperamental traits and indicators of school readiness than can be found in the extant literature, and will provide the groundwork for future research to test specific hypotheses related to the effect temperamental constellations have on children’s school readiness. View Full-Text
Keywords: temperament; effortful control; school readiness; canonical correlation; SECCYD temperament; effortful control; school readiness; canonical correlation; SECCYD
MDPI and ACS Style

White, A.S.; Sirota, K.M.; Frohn, S.R.; Swenson, S.E.; Rudasill, K.M. Temperamental Constellations and School Readiness: A MultiVariate Approach. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 55. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18010055

AMA Style

White AS, Sirota KM, Frohn SR, Swenson SE, Rudasill KM. Temperamental Constellations and School Readiness: A MultiVariate Approach. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2021; 18(1):55. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18010055

Chicago/Turabian Style

White, Andrew S.; Sirota, Kate M.; Frohn, Scott R.; Swenson, Sara E.; Rudasill, Kathleen M. 2021. "Temperamental Constellations and School Readiness: A MultiVariate Approach" Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 18, no. 1: 55. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18010055

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