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Article

Implementation and Maintenance of a Community-Based Intervention for Refugee Youth Reporting Symptoms of Post-Traumatic Stress: Lessons from Successful Sites

Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, 751 23 Uppsala, Sweden
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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(1), 43; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18010043
Received: 2 November 2020 / Revised: 15 December 2020 / Accepted: 16 December 2020 / Published: 23 December 2020
Over the last few years there have been attempts to scale-up Teaching Recovery Techniques (TRT), a community-based group intervention for refugee youth reporting symptoms of post-traumatic stress, across Sweden using the distribution network pathway model. This implementation model allows for quick spread, but only for a low level of control at local sites. This study explores factors and agents that have facilitated the implementation and maintenance of the community-based intervention in successful sites. Seven semi-structured interviews were conducted with personnel from “successful” community sites, defined as having conducted at least two groups and maintaining full delivery. Data were analyzed using content analysis to identify a theme and categories. The main theme “Active networking and collaboration” was key to successful maintenance of community-based delivery. Categories included “Going to where the potential recipients are”, relating to the importance of networks, and “Resource availability and management for maintenance”, relating to the challenges due to the lack of a lead organization supplying necessary funds and support for maintenance. Additionally, “Careful integration of the interpreter” underlined that interpreters were essential co-facilitators of the intervention. Although the interviewed professionals represented successful sites, they remained dependent on informal networks and collaboration for successful maintenance of community-based delivery. View Full-Text
Keywords: trauma; child; refugee; mental health; implementation; community-based intervention trauma; child; refugee; mental health; implementation; community-based intervention
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MDPI and ACS Style

Lampa, E.; Sarkadi, A.; Warner, G. Implementation and Maintenance of a Community-Based Intervention for Refugee Youth Reporting Symptoms of Post-Traumatic Stress: Lessons from Successful Sites. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 43. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18010043

AMA Style

Lampa E, Sarkadi A, Warner G. Implementation and Maintenance of a Community-Based Intervention for Refugee Youth Reporting Symptoms of Post-Traumatic Stress: Lessons from Successful Sites. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2021; 18(1):43. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18010043

Chicago/Turabian Style

Lampa, Elin, Anna Sarkadi, and Georgina Warner. 2021. "Implementation and Maintenance of a Community-Based Intervention for Refugee Youth Reporting Symptoms of Post-Traumatic Stress: Lessons from Successful Sites" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 18, no. 1: 43. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18010043

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