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Article

Inter- and Intra-Day Comparisons of Smartphone-Derived Heart Rate Variability across Resistance Training Overload and Taper Microcycles

1
Department of Kinesiology, Samford University, Birmingham, AL 35229, USA
2
Department of Kinesiology, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(1), 177; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18010177
Received: 24 November 2020 / Revised: 21 December 2020 / Accepted: 23 December 2020 / Published: 29 December 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Exercise and Sport in Stressful Conditions and Environments)
The purposes of this study were: (1) to determine if smartphone-derived heart rate variability (HRV) could detect changes in training load during an overload microcycle and taper, and (2) to determine the reliability of HRV measured in the morning and measured immediately prior to the testing session. Twelve powerlifters (male = 10, female = 2) completed a 3-week resistance training program consisting of an introduction microcycle, overload microcycle, and taper. Using a validated smartphone application, daily measures of resting, ultra-short natural logarithm of root mean square of successive differences were recorded in the morning (LnRMSSDM) and immediately before the test session (LnRMSSDT) following baseline, post-overload, and post-taper testing. LnRMSSDM decreased from baseline (82.9 ± 13.0) to post-overload (75.0 ± 9.9, p = 0.019), while post-taper LnRMSSDM (81.9 ± 7.1) was not different from post-overload (p = 0.056) or baseline (p = 0.998). No differences in LnRMSSDT (p < 0.05) were observed between baseline (78.3 ± 9.0), post-overload (74.4 ± 10.2), and post-taper (78.3 ± 8.0). LnRMSSDM and LnRMSSDT were strongly correlated at baseline (ICC = 0.71, p < 0.001) and post-overload (ICC = 0.65, p = 0.010), whereas there was no relationship at post-taper (ICC = 0.44, p = 0.054). Bland–Altman analyses suggest extremely wide limits of agreement (Bias ± 1.96 SD) between LnRMSSDM and LnRMSSDT at baseline (4.7 ± 15.2), post-overload (0.5 ± 16.9), and post-taper (3.7 ± 15.3). Smartphone-derived HRV, recorded upon waking, was sensitive to resistance training loads across an overload and taper microcycles in competitive strength athletes, whereas the HRV was taken immediately prior to the testing session was not. View Full-Text
Keywords: athlete monitoring; powerlifting; bench press; strength athlete monitoring; powerlifting; bench press; strength
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MDPI and ACS Style

Williams, T.D.; Esco, M.R.; Fedewa, M.V.; Bishop, P.A. Inter- and Intra-Day Comparisons of Smartphone-Derived Heart Rate Variability across Resistance Training Overload and Taper Microcycles. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 177. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18010177

AMA Style

Williams TD, Esco MR, Fedewa MV, Bishop PA. Inter- and Intra-Day Comparisons of Smartphone-Derived Heart Rate Variability across Resistance Training Overload and Taper Microcycles. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2021; 18(1):177. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18010177

Chicago/Turabian Style

Williams, Tyler D., Michael R. Esco, Michael V. Fedewa, and Phillip A. Bishop. 2021. "Inter- and Intra-Day Comparisons of Smartphone-Derived Heart Rate Variability across Resistance Training Overload and Taper Microcycles" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 18, no. 1: 177. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18010177

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