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Article

Obstetricians’ and Gynecologists’ Communication Practices around Smoking Cessation in Pregnancy, Secondhand Smoke and Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS): A Survey

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SIDS Center of New Jersey, Department of Pediatrics, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ 08901, USA
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Center for Tobacco Studies, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ 08901, USA
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Department of Medicine, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ 08901, USA
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Department of Health Behavior, Society & Policy, Rutgers-School of Public Health, Piscataway, NJ 08854, USA
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Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(8), 2908; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17082908
Received: 9 March 2020 / Revised: 7 April 2020 / Accepted: 16 April 2020 / Published: 23 April 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Smoking Cessation in Pregnancy and Postpartum)
Secondhand smoke (SHS) is a potential direct cause of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) among infants. Disparities in SHS exposure and SIDS deaths may be due to inconsistent communication among practitioners about SHS/SIDS risks. In order to assess current SHS/SIDS risks and communication practices and to identify areas of improvement, we conducted a survey of 316 obstetricians and gynecologists (ob/gyns) about the length of time spent having discussions, supplemental materials used, risks covered, cessation, and frequency of discussions. Most (55.3%) reported spending 1–4 min discussing risks/cessation. Nearly a third reported not using any supplemental materials; few used apps (4.4%) or videos (1.9%). Assisting patients with steps toward cessation was infrequent. Few ob/gyns had discussions with patients immediately postpartum. Only 51.9% strongly agreed that they felt sufficiently informed about SHS/SIDS risks to educate their patients. The communication by ob/gyns of SHS/SIDS risk varies greatly and presents opportunities for improvement. Each additional minute spent having discussions and the use of supplemental materials, such as apps, may improve communication effectiveness. The discussion of smoking behaviors immediately postpartum may help to prevent smoker relapse. An increased awareness of statewide cessation resources by ob/gyns is needed to assist patients with cessation. The development of standardized risk messaging may reduce the variation in communication practices among ob/gyns. View Full-Text
Keywords: cessation; secondhand smoke; SIDS; risk communication; obstetricians and gynecologists; pediatrics cessation; secondhand smoke; SIDS; risk communication; obstetricians and gynecologists; pediatrics
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MDPI and ACS Style

Sontag, J.M.; Singh, B.; Ostfeld, B.M.; Hegyi, T.; Steinberg, M.B.; Delnevo, C.D. Obstetricians’ and Gynecologists’ Communication Practices around Smoking Cessation in Pregnancy, Secondhand Smoke and Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS): A Survey. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 2908. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17082908

AMA Style

Sontag JM, Singh B, Ostfeld BM, Hegyi T, Steinberg MB, Delnevo CD. Obstetricians’ and Gynecologists’ Communication Practices around Smoking Cessation in Pregnancy, Secondhand Smoke and Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS): A Survey. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2020; 17(8):2908. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17082908

Chicago/Turabian Style

Sontag, Jennah M., Binu Singh, Barbara M. Ostfeld, Thomas Hegyi, Michael B. Steinberg, and Cristine D. Delnevo 2020. "Obstetricians’ and Gynecologists’ Communication Practices around Smoking Cessation in Pregnancy, Secondhand Smoke and Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS): A Survey" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 17, no. 8: 2908. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17082908

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