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Open AccessArticle

“Let’s Talk about Physical Activity”: Understanding the Preferences of Under-Served Communities when Messaging Physical Activity Guidelines to the Public

1
The National Institute for Health Research Applied Research Collaboration West (NIHR ARC West), University Hospitals Bristol National Health Service Foundation Trust, Bristol BS1 3NU, UK
2
Population Health Sciences, Bristol Medical School, University of Bristol, Bristol BS8 1TH, UK
3
Knowle West Media Centre, Bristol, Bristol BS4 1NL, UK
4
Mufti Games, Bristol BS5 6JL, UK
5
Centre for Exercise, Nutrition and Health Sciences, School for Policy Studies, University of Bristol, Bristol BS8 1TH, UK
6
Department of Health and Social Sciences, Faculty of Health and Applied Sciences, University of the West of England, Bristol BS16 1QY, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(8), 2782; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17082782
Received: 23 March 2020 / Revised: 7 April 2020 / Accepted: 9 April 2020 / Published: 17 April 2020
(This article belongs to the Section Health Communication)
Despite many countries having physical activity guidelines, there have been few concerted efforts to mobilize this information to the public. The aim of this study was to understand the preferences of under-served community groups about how the benefits of physical activity, and associated guidelines, can be better communicated to the public. Participatory workshops, co-developed between researchers, a local charity, and a community artist, were used to gather data from four groups in Bristol, UK: young people (n = 17); adults (n = 11); older adults (n = 5); and Somali women (n = 15). Workshop content was structured around the study aims. The community artist and/or the local charity delivered the workshops, with researchers gathering data via observation, photos, and audio-recordings, which were analysed using the framework method. All four groups noted that the benefits of physical activity should be included within any communications efforts, though not restricted to health-related benefits. Language used should be simple and jargon-free; terms such as “sedentary”, “vigorous” and “intensity” were deemed inaccessible, however all groups liked the message “some is good, more is better”. Views about preferred mechanisms, and messenger, for delivering physical activity messages varied both between, and within, groups. Recommendations for those working in physical activity communications, research, and policy are provided. View Full-Text
Keywords: physical activity; guidelines; communication; qualitative research; messaging; social marketing physical activity; guidelines; communication; qualitative research; messaging; social marketing
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MDPI and ACS Style

Nobles, J.; Thomas, C.; Banks Gross, Z.; Hamilton, M.; Trinder-Widdess, Z.; Speed, C.; Gibson, A.; Davies, R.; Farr, M.; Jago, R.; Foster, C.; Redwood, S. “Let’s Talk about Physical Activity”: Understanding the Preferences of Under-Served Communities when Messaging Physical Activity Guidelines to the Public. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 2782.

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