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Open AccessArticle

The Effects of Family Financial Stress and Primary Caregivers’ Levels of Acculturation on Children’s Emotional and Behavioral Problems among Humanitarian Refugees in Australia

by 1,2, 3,4, 1,2, 1,2 and 1,2,3,*
1
Department of Medical Statistics, School of Public Health, Sun Yat-sen University, Zhongshan Road 2, Guangzhou 510080, China
2
Sun Yat-sen Centre for Migrant Health Policy, Sun Yat-sen University, Zhongshan Road 2, Guangzhou 510080, China
3
School of Social Science, Western Sydney University, Locked Bag 1797, Penrith, NSW 2751, Australia
4
Translational Health Research Institute, Penrith, NSW 2751, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(8), 2716; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17082716
Received: 6 March 2020 / Revised: 9 April 2020 / Accepted: 11 April 2020 / Published: 15 April 2020
The present study evaluated the application of the basic and extended (incorporated primary caregivers’ levels of acculturation) Family Stress Model (FSM) to understand the effect of family financial stress and primary caregivers’ levels of acculturation on children’s emotional and behavioral problems among refugees in Australia. A total of 658 refugee children aged 5–17 and their primary caregivers (n = 410) from the third wave of a nationwide longitudinal project were included in this study. We used multilevel structural equation models with bootstrapping to test the indirect effects of family financial stress and caregivers’ levels of acculturation (including English proficiency, self-sufficiency, social interaction, and self-identity) on children’s emotional and behavioral problems through caregivers’ psychological distress and parenting styles. The results showed that the extended FSM improved the model fit statistics, explaining 45.8% variation in children’s emotional and behavioral problems. Family financial stress, caregivers’ English proficiency, and self-identity had indirect effects on children’s emotional and behavioral problems through caregivers’ psychological distress and hostile parenting. The findings showed that interventions aimed at reducing caregivers’ psychological distress and negative parenting could be effective in alleviating the adverse effects of family financial stress and caregivers’ low levels of acculturation on refugee children’s mental health. View Full-Text
Keywords: family financial stress; acculturation; emotional and behavioral problems; psychological distress; parenting styles; refugee children family financial stress; acculturation; emotional and behavioral problems; psychological distress; parenting styles; refugee children
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MDPI and ACS Style

Yu, L.; Renzaho, A.M.N.; Shi, L.; Ling, L.; Chen, W. The Effects of Family Financial Stress and Primary Caregivers’ Levels of Acculturation on Children’s Emotional and Behavioral Problems among Humanitarian Refugees in Australia. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 2716. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17082716

AMA Style

Yu L, Renzaho AMN, Shi L, Ling L, Chen W. The Effects of Family Financial Stress and Primary Caregivers’ Levels of Acculturation on Children’s Emotional and Behavioral Problems among Humanitarian Refugees in Australia. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2020; 17(8):2716. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17082716

Chicago/Turabian Style

Yu, Linlin; Renzaho, Andre M.N.; Shi, Lishuo; Ling, Li; Chen, Wen. 2020. "The Effects of Family Financial Stress and Primary Caregivers’ Levels of Acculturation on Children’s Emotional and Behavioral Problems among Humanitarian Refugees in Australia" Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 17, no. 8: 2716. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17082716

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