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Article

Cognitive Function and Mortality: Results from Kaunas HAPIEE Study 2006–2017

1
Institute of Cardiology, Medical Academy, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, LT-50162 Kaunas, Lithuania
2
Health Psychology Department, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, LT-47181 Kaunas, Lithuania
3
Institute of Epidemiology and Health Care, University College London, London WC1E 7HB, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(7), 2397; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17072397
Received: 11 February 2020 / Revised: 30 March 2020 / Accepted: 30 March 2020 / Published: 1 April 2020
(This article belongs to the Collection Aging and Public Health)
Background: The purpose of the study is to evaluate the association between cognitive function and risk of all-cause and cardiovascular disease mortality during 10 years of the follow-up. Methods: 7087 participants were assessed in the baseline survey of the Health Alcohol Psychosocial Factors in Eastern Europe (HAPIEE) study in 2006–2008. During 10 years of follow-up, all-cause and CVD mortality risk were evaluated. Results: During 10 years of follow-up, 768 (23%) men and 403 (11%) women died (239 and 107 from CVD). After adjustment for sociodemographic, biological, lifestyle factors, and illnesses, a decrease per 1 standard deviation in different cognitive function scores increased risk for all-cause mortality (by 13%–24% in men, and 17%–33% in women) and CVD mortality (by 19%–32% in men, and 69%–91% in women). Kaplan-Meier survival curves for all-cause and CVD mortality, according to tertiles of cognitive function, revealed that the lowest cognitive function (1st tertile) predicts shorter survival compared to second and third tertiles (p < 0.001). Conclusions: The findings of this follow-up study suggest that older participants with lower cognitive functions have an increased risk for all-cause and CVD mortality compared to older participants with a higher level of cognitive function. View Full-Text
Keywords: cognitive functions; cardiovascular mortality; all-cause mortality cognitive functions; cardiovascular mortality; all-cause mortality
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MDPI and ACS Style

Tamosiunas, A.; Sapranaviciute-Zabazlajeva, L.; Luksiene, D.; Virviciute, D.; Bobak, M. Cognitive Function and Mortality: Results from Kaunas HAPIEE Study 2006–2017. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 2397. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17072397

AMA Style

Tamosiunas A, Sapranaviciute-Zabazlajeva L, Luksiene D, Virviciute D, Bobak M. Cognitive Function and Mortality: Results from Kaunas HAPIEE Study 2006–2017. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2020; 17(7):2397. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17072397

Chicago/Turabian Style

Tamosiunas, Abdonas, Laura Sapranaviciute-Zabazlajeva, Dalia Luksiene, Dalia Virviciute, and Martin Bobak. 2020. "Cognitive Function and Mortality: Results from Kaunas HAPIEE Study 2006–2017" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 17, no. 7: 2397. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17072397

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