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Open AccessArticle

Urinary Arsenic Species are Detectable in Urban Underserved Hispanic/Latino Populations: A Pilot Study from the Study of Latinos: Nutrition & Physical Activity Assessment Study (SOLNAS)

1
Department of Epidemiology and Population Health, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY 10461, USA
2
Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032, USA
3
Department of Biostatistics, Epidemiology and Informatics, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA
4
Division of Molecular Pathology and Genomics, University of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis, MN 55455, USA
5
Collaborative Studies Coordinating Center, Department of Biostatistics, Gillings School of Global Public Health, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA
6
Public Health Sciences Division, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA 98109, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
These authors share senior authorship.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(7), 2247; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17072247 (registering DOI)
Received: 13 February 2020 / Revised: 20 March 2020 / Accepted: 24 March 2020 / Published: 27 March 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Toxicology and Environmental Epidemiology: Feature Papers)
Background: Hispanics/Latinos represent >15% of the United States (US) population and experience a high burden of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and diabetes. Dietary exposure, particularly to arsenic (As), may be associated with CVD and diabetes in Hispanics/Latinos. Rural populations in the US exposed to As in drinking water have increased risk of diabetes and CVD; however, little is known about the risk among urban populations with low As in water who are mostly exposed to As through food. Methods: To explore the levels of inorganic arsenic exposure (the sum of inorganic and methylated arsenic species in urine, ∑As, corrected by a residual-based method) in persons of Hispanic/Latino origin, we conducted a pilot study quantifying urinary arsenic levels among 45 participants in the Study of Latinos: Nutrition & Physical Activity Assessment Study (SOLNAS). Results: The median (interquartile range) of the urinary arsenic species (µg/L) were as follows: inorganic As 0.6 (0.4, 1.0), monomethylarsonic acid 1.2 (0.7, 1.9), dimethylarsinic acid 7.2 (4.3, 15.3), and ∑As 6.0 (4.3, 10.5). Conclusions: This study adds to the existing evidence that harmful forms of arsenic are present in this group of Hispanics/Latinos.
Keywords: arsenic; urine; Hispanic/Latino; dietary; environmental arsenic; urine; Hispanic/Latino; dietary; environmental
MDPI and ACS Style

Hosgood, H.D.; Slavkovich, V.; Hua, S.; Klugman, M.; Grau-Perez, M.; Thyagarajan, B.; Graziano, J.; Cai, J.; Shaw, P.A.; Kaplan, R.; Navas-Acien, A.; Mossavar-Rahmani, Y. Urinary Arsenic Species are Detectable in Urban Underserved Hispanic/Latino Populations: A Pilot Study from the Study of Latinos: Nutrition & Physical Activity Assessment Study (SOLNAS). Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 2247.

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