Next Article in Journal
Atlanta Residents’ Knowledge Regarding Heavy Metal Exposures and Remediation in Urban Agriculture
Next Article in Special Issue
Proximity to Screening Site, Rurality, and Neighborhood Disadvantage: Treatment Status among Individuals with Sexually Transmitted Infections in Yakima County, Washington
Previous Article in Journal
Knowledge and Disposal Practice of Leftover and Expired Medicine: A Cross-Sectional Study from Nursing and Pharmacy Students’ Perspectives
Open AccessArticle

Qualitative Field Observation of Pedestrian Injury Hotspots: A Mixed-Methods Approach for Developing Built- and Socioeconomic-Environmental Risk Signatures

1
Department of Geography, Simon Fraser University, 8888 University Drive, Burnaby, BC V5A 1S6, Canada
2
Institut für Geographie, Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Wetterkreuz 15, 91058 Erlangen, Germany
3
Spokane Health Education and Research Building Third Floor, P O Box 1495, Spokane, WA 99210-1495, Canada
4
Pediatric General Surgery, Alberta Children’s Hospital, 28 Oki Drive NW, Calgary, AB T3B 6A8, Canada
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(6), 2066; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17062066
Received: 20 February 2020 / Revised: 17 March 2020 / Accepted: 19 March 2020 / Published: 20 March 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Space, Place and Health Outcomes)
Road traffic injuries constitute a significant global health burden; the World Health Organization estimates that they result in 1.35 million deaths annually. While most pedestrian injury studies rely predominantly on statistical modelling, this paper argues for a mixed-methods approach combining spatial analysis, environmental scans, and local knowledge for assessing environmental risk factors. Using data from the Nova Scotia Trauma Registry, severe pedestrian injury cases and ten corresponding hotspots were mapped across the Halifax Regional Municipality. Using qualitative observation, quantitative environmental scans, and a socioeconomic deprivation index, we assessed hotspots over three years to identify key social- and built-environmental correlates. Injuries occurred in a range of settings; however, clear patterns were not observed based on land use, age, or socio-economic status (SES) alone. Three hotspots revealed an association between elevated pedestrian injury and a pattern of geographic, environmental, and socio-economic factors: low- to middle-SES housing separated from a roadside attraction by several lanes of traffic, and blind hills/bends. An additional generalized scenario was constructed representing common risk factors across all hotspots. This study is unique in that it moves beyond individual measures (e.g., statistical, environmental scans, or geographic information systems (GIS) mapping) to combine all three methods toward identifying environmental features associated with pedestrian motor vehicle crashes (PMVC). View Full-Text
Keywords: pedestrian injury; geographic information systems; mapping; hotspots; socio-economic status; mixed methods pedestrian injury; geographic information systems; mapping; hotspots; socio-economic status; mixed methods
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

MDPI and ACS Style

Schuurman, N.; Walker, B.B.; Swanlund, D.; Amram, O.; Yanchar, N.L. Qualitative Field Observation of Pedestrian Injury Hotspots: A Mixed-Methods Approach for Developing Built- and Socioeconomic-Environmental Risk Signatures. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 2066. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17062066

AMA Style

Schuurman N, Walker BB, Swanlund D, Amram O, Yanchar NL. Qualitative Field Observation of Pedestrian Injury Hotspots: A Mixed-Methods Approach for Developing Built- and Socioeconomic-Environmental Risk Signatures. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2020; 17(6):2066. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17062066

Chicago/Turabian Style

Schuurman, Nadine; Walker, Blake B.; Swanlund, David; Amram, Ofer; Yanchar, Natalie L. 2020. "Qualitative Field Observation of Pedestrian Injury Hotspots: A Mixed-Methods Approach for Developing Built- and Socioeconomic-Environmental Risk Signatures" Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 17, no. 6: 2066. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17062066

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop