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Article

Footprint Curvature in Spanish Women: Implications for Footwear Fit

1
Departamento de Patología y Cirugía. Universidad Miguel Hernández de Elche. Crta. N 332 Km 87 s/n., 03550 Sant Joan d’Alacant (Alicante), Spain
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Departamento de Ciencias de Comportamiento y Salud. Universidad Miguel Hernández de Elche. Crta. N 332 Km 87 s/n., 03550 Sant Joan d’Alacant (Alicante), Spain
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Frailty and cognitive impairment organized group (FROG), University of Valencia, 46010 Valencia, Spain
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Department of Nursing, University of Valencia, c/Jaume Roig s/n, 4610 Valencia, Spain
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Instituto Centro de Investigación Operativa, Universidad Miguel Hernández de Elche. Crta. N 332 Km 8 s/n., 03550 Sant Joan d’Alacant (Alicante), Spain
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(6), 1876; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17061876
Received: 8 February 2020 / Revised: 6 March 2020 / Accepted: 9 March 2020 / Published: 13 March 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Podiatry and Health)
The incorrect adjustment of footwear produces alterations in the foot that affect quality of life. The usual measurements for shoe design are lengths, widths and girths, but these measures are insufficient. The foot presents an angle between the forefoot and the rearfoot in the transverse plane, which is associated with foot pronation, hallux valgus and metatarsus adductus. Here, we aimed at identifying the groups formed by the angulations between the forefoot and rearfoot using a sample of footprints from 102 Spanish women. The angle between the forefoot and rearfoot was measured according to the method described by Bunch. A cluster analysis was performed using the K-means algorithm. Footprints were grouped into three types: curved, semi-curved and straight, according to the degrees of angulation between the forefoot and rearfoot. There is great variability in the morphology of the foot. Based on our findings, to achieve a better footwear fit, we propose the manufacture of three types of lasts with different curvatures. View Full-Text
Keywords: shoes; anthropometry; foot diseases; clustering shoes; anthropometry; foot diseases; clustering
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MDPI and ACS Style

Alonso-Montero, C.; Torres-Rubio, A.; Padrós-Flores, N.; Navarro-Flores, E.; Segura-Heras, J.V. Footprint Curvature in Spanish Women: Implications for Footwear Fit. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 1876. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17061876

AMA Style

Alonso-Montero C, Torres-Rubio A, Padrós-Flores N, Navarro-Flores E, Segura-Heras JV. Footprint Curvature in Spanish Women: Implications for Footwear Fit. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2020; 17(6):1876. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17061876

Chicago/Turabian Style

Alonso-Montero, Carolina; Torres-Rubio, Anselén; Padrós-Flores, Nuria; Navarro-Flores, Emmanuel; Segura-Heras, José V. 2020. "Footprint Curvature in Spanish Women: Implications for Footwear Fit" Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 17, no. 6: 1876. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17061876

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