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Article

Longitudinal Analysis of Plantar Pressures with Wear of a Running Shoe

1
University Clinic of Podiatry CPUEX, University of Extremadura, Centro Universitario de Plasencia, Avda, Virgen del Puerto 2, 10600 Plasencia, Spain
2
Nursing Department, University of Extremadura, 10071 Cáceres, Spain
3
Physiotherapy Department, University of Sevilla, 41004 Sevilla, Spain
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(5), 1707; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17051707
Received: 11 February 2020 / Revised: 2 March 2020 / Accepted: 3 March 2020 / Published: 5 March 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Podiatry and Health)
Running shoes typically have a lifespan of 300–1000 km, and the plantar pressure pattern during running may change as the shoe wears. So, the aim of this study was to determine the variation of plantar pressures with shoe wear, and the runner’s subjective sensation. Maximun Plantar Pressures (MMP) were measured from 33 male recreational runners at three times during a training season (beginning, 350 km, and 700 km) using the Biofoot/IBV® in-shoe system (Biofoot/IBV®, Valencia, Spain). All the runners wore the same shoes (New Balance® 738, Boston, MA, USA) during this period, and performed similar training. The zones supporting most pressure at all three study times were the medial (inner) column of the foot and the forefoot. There was a significant increase in pressure on the midfoot over the course of the training season (from 387.8 to 590 kPa, p = 0.003). The runners who felt the worst cushioning under the midfoot were those who had the highest peak pressures in that area (p = 0.002). The New Balance® 738 running shoe effectively maintains the plantar pressure pattern after 700 km of use under all the zones studied except the midfoot, probably due to material fatigue or deficits of the specific cushioning systems in that area. View Full-Text
Keywords: running shoes; baropodometry; plantar pressures; Biofoot/IBV®; running running shoes; baropodometry; plantar pressures; Biofoot/IBV®; running
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MDPI and ACS Style

Escamilla-Martínez, E.; Gómez-Martín, B.; Fernández-Seguín, L.M.; Martínez-Nova, A.; Pedrera-Zamorano, J.D.; Sánchez-Rodríguez, R. Longitudinal Analysis of Plantar Pressures with Wear of a Running Shoe. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 1707. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17051707

AMA Style

Escamilla-Martínez E, Gómez-Martín B, Fernández-Seguín LM, Martínez-Nova A, Pedrera-Zamorano JD, Sánchez-Rodríguez R. Longitudinal Analysis of Plantar Pressures with Wear of a Running Shoe. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2020; 17(5):1707. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17051707

Chicago/Turabian Style

Escamilla-Martínez, Elena, Beatriz Gómez-Martín, Lourdes M. Fernández-Seguín, Alfonso Martínez-Nova, Juan D. Pedrera-Zamorano, and Raquel Sánchez-Rodríguez. 2020. "Longitudinal Analysis of Plantar Pressures with Wear of a Running Shoe" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 17, no. 5: 1707. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17051707

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