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Article

Carers’ Motivations for, and Experiences of, Participating in Suicide Research

1
School of Health, Faculty of Medicine and Health, University of New England, Armidale, NSW 2351, Australia
2
Sydney School of Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine and Health, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia
3
School of Social Work and Human Service, Thompson Rivers University, Kamloops, BC V2C 0C8, Canada
4
National Suicide Research Foundation, Western Gateway Building, Western Road, Cork T12 XF62, Ireland
5
School of Public Health, University College Cork, Cork T12 XF62, Ireland
6
Formerly SANE Australia, South Melbourne, VIC 3205, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(5), 1733; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17051733
Received: 24 January 2020 / Revised: 26 February 2020 / Accepted: 3 March 2020 / Published: 6 March 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers: New Trends in Suicide Prevention)
(1) Background: First-hand accounts of lived experience of suicide remain rare in the research literature. Increasing interest in the lived experience of suicide is resulting in more opportunities for people to participate in research based on their personal experience. How individuals choose to participate in research, and their experience of doing so, are important considerations in the ethical conduct of research. (2) Methods: To understand the experience of providing care for someone who has previously attempted suicide, a cross-sectional online community survey was conducted. This survey concluded with questions regarding motivation to participate and the experience of doing so. Of the 758 individuals who participated in the survey, 545 provided open-ended text responses to questions regarding motivation and 523 did so for questions regarding the experience of participating. It is these responses that are the focus of this paper. Data were analysed thematically. (3) Results: Motivations to participate were expressed as primarily altruistic in nature, with a future focus on improving the experience of the person who had attempted suicide alongside carers to ease distress. The experience of participating was difficult yet manageable, for all but a few participants. (4) Conclusions: With the increasing interest in first-hand accounts of suicide, how individuals experience participation in research is an important focus that requires further attention. View Full-Text
Keywords: suicide attempt; carers; lived experience; research participation; ethical research suicide attempt; carers; lived experience; research participation; ethical research
MDPI and ACS Style

Maple, M.; Wayland, S.; Sanford, R.; Spillane, A.; Coker, S. Carers’ Motivations for, and Experiences of, Participating in Suicide Research. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 1733. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17051733

AMA Style

Maple M, Wayland S, Sanford R, Spillane A, Coker S. Carers’ Motivations for, and Experiences of, Participating in Suicide Research. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2020; 17(5):1733. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17051733

Chicago/Turabian Style

Maple, Myfanwy, Sarah Wayland, Rebecca Sanford, Ailbhe Spillane, and Sarah Coker. 2020. "Carers’ Motivations for, and Experiences of, Participating in Suicide Research" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 17, no. 5: 1733. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17051733

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