Next Article in Journal
Cross-Lagged Associations between Depressive Symptoms and Response Style in Adolescents
Next Article in Special Issue
Intersection of Migration and Access to Health Care: Experiences and Perceptions of Female Economic Migrants in Canada
Previous Article in Journal
Masticatory Muscles Activity in Sport Climbers
Addendum published on 3 July 2020, see Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(13), 4808.
Article

Migration, Stress and the Challenges of Accessing Food: An Exploratory Study of the Experience of Recent Afghan Women Refugees in Adelaide, Australia

1
College of Nursing and Health Sciences, Flinders University, GPO Box, Adelaide 2100, Australia
2
College of Medicine & Public Health, Flinders University, GPO Box, Adelaide 2100, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(4), 1379; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17041379
Received: 31 January 2020 / Revised: 17 February 2020 / Accepted: 18 February 2020 / Published: 21 February 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers: Global Health)
This study explored the migration and food experiences of Afghani women refugees residing in Adelaide, South Australia for 2 years or less. In-depth semi-structured qualitative interviews were conducted with 10 women between May and September 2017. The data were thematically analysed, and the Social Determinants of Health Framework was used to discuss the findings. Five key themes emerged from the data. In the transition country (Iran/Pakistan), respondents experienced (i) trauma, discrimination and exclusion and (ii) familiar food culture, but food stress. In the destination country (Adelaide, Australia) respondents experienced (iii) a sense of precariousness, (iv) unfamiliar food culture and (v) challenges in accessing halal food. Afghani refugees experienced considerable stressors both in the transition and the final destination country but for different reasons. In the transition country, stresses related to the lack of social services and support, discrimination, racism and poverty seemed to have affected their ability to afford food. In Australia stressors pertaining to socioeconomic, housing and employment precariousness, as well as difficulties in accessing halal foods were identified as challenges. Furthermore, food stress in Australia was associated with the cultural appropriateness of food, the complexity of the food system, and the women’s lack of skills and experiences in navigating the food system. With increasing refugee and immigration flows globally, it is necessary to acknowledge how food and social determinants intersect for refugee immigrants to ensure positive health outcomes. View Full-Text
Keywords: refugees; Afghani women; migration; food access refugees; Afghani women; migration; food access
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Kavian, F.; Mehta, K.; Willis, E.; Mwanri, L.; Ward, P.; Booth, S. Migration, Stress and the Challenges of Accessing Food: An Exploratory Study of the Experience of Recent Afghan Women Refugees in Adelaide, Australia. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 1379. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17041379

AMA Style

Kavian F, Mehta K, Willis E, Mwanri L, Ward P, Booth S. Migration, Stress and the Challenges of Accessing Food: An Exploratory Study of the Experience of Recent Afghan Women Refugees in Adelaide, Australia. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2020; 17(4):1379. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17041379

Chicago/Turabian Style

Kavian, Foorough, Kaye Mehta, Eileen Willis, Lillian Mwanri, Paul Ward, and Sue Booth. 2020. "Migration, Stress and the Challenges of Accessing Food: An Exploratory Study of the Experience of Recent Afghan Women Refugees in Adelaide, Australia" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 17, no. 4: 1379. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17041379

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop