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Open AccessArticle

Geographical Disparities in Screening and Cancer-Related Health Behaviour

1
Cancer Council Queensland, 553 Gregory Terrace, Fortitude Valley QLD 4006, Australia
2
Institute for Resilient Regions, University of Southern Queensland, Springfield QLD 4300, Australia
3
School of Psychology, University of Southern Queensland, Springfield QLD 4300, Australia
4
Menzies Institute of Health Queensland, Griffith University, Gold Coast QLD 4215, Australia
5
School of Mathematical Sciences, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane QLD 4000, Australia
6
Faculty of Health, University of Technology Sydney, Ultimo NSW 2007, Australia
7
Exercise Medicine Research Institute, Edith Cowan University, Joondalup WA 6027, Australia
8
School of Nursing & Midwifery, University of Southern Queensland, Toowoomba QLD 4370, Australia
9
School of Public Health, The University of Queensland, St Lucia, QLD 4702, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(4), 1246; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17041246
Received: 15 January 2020 / Revised: 10 February 2020 / Accepted: 10 February 2020 / Published: 14 February 2020
(This article belongs to the Section Global Health)
This study aimed to identify whether cancer-related health behaviours including participation in cancer screening vary by geographic location in Australia. Data were obtained from the 2014–2015 Australian National Health Survey, a computer-assisted telephone interview that measured a range of health-related issues in a sample of randomly selected households. Chi-square tests and adjusted odds ratios from logistic regression models were computed to assess the association between residential location and cancer-related health behaviours including cancer screening participation, alcohol consumption, smoking, exercise, and fruit and vegetable intake, controlling for age, socio-economic status (SES), education, and place of birth. The findings show insufficient exercise, risky alcohol intake, meeting vegetable intake guidelines, and participation in cervical screening are more likely for those living in inner regional areas and in outer regional/remote areas compared with those living in major cities. Daily smoking and participation in prostate cancer screening were significantly higher for those living in outer regional/remote areas. While participation in cancer screening in Australia does not appear to be negatively impacted by regional or remote living, lifestyle behaviours associated with cancer incidence and mortality are poorer in regional and remote areas. Population-based interventions targeting health behaviour change may be an appropriate target for reducing geographical disparities in cancer outcomes. View Full-Text
Keywords: geographical disparity; health behavior; cancer; public health; diet exercise; alcohol; smoking; cancer screening; regional; remote geographical disparity; health behavior; cancer; public health; diet exercise; alcohol; smoking; cancer screening; regional; remote
MDPI and ACS Style

Goodwin, B.C.; Rowe, A.K.; Crawford-Williams, F.; Baade, P.; Chambers, S.K.; Ralph, N.; Aitken, J.F. Geographical Disparities in Screening and Cancer-Related Health Behaviour. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 1246.

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