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Response to Buonocore et al. Comments on Wendt Hess et al. “Assessing Agreement in Exposure Classification between Proximity-Based Metrics and Air Monitoring Data in Epidemiology Studies of Unconventional Resource Development.” Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16, 3055
Open AccessArticle

Socio-Psychological Impacts of Hydraulic Fracturing on Community Health and Well-Being

1
Department of Sociology, Social Work & Anthropology, Utah State University, 0730 Old Main Hill, Logan, UT 84322-0730, USA
2
Department of Social Science, University of Texas-Permian Basin, 4901 East University, Odessa, TX 79762, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(4), 1186; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17041186
Received: 10 December 2019 / Revised: 7 February 2020 / Accepted: 8 February 2020 / Published: 13 February 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Shale Gas and Fracking: Impacts on Health and the Environment)
At the core of the hydraulic fracturing (fracking) debate is the level of perceived risk involved with extractive industries, such as the release of toxic and carcinogenic chemicals, increased population growth, and truck traffic. However, industry supporters of fracking acclaim the benefits of oil and gas drilling, such as energy independence and economic gains. In this study, we examine the perceived impacts of hydraulic fracturing (fracking) on community health and well-being based on interviews with anti-fracking activists in Denton, Texas who were active in the “anti-fracking” community organization, Frack Free Denton (FFD). Emergent from the interviews, we discuss the socio-psychological stressors these community members experienced following the introduction of hydraulic fracturing in the region. Some of the major socio-psychological impacts included perceived physical health risks through anxiety surrounding toxins and carcinogens that may be released through this process. Participants also discussed stress put on community relations, primarily through the form of an “us vs. them” mentality related to the support for, or opposition to, fracking in the community. Moreover, we found anxiety and stress surrounding trust in community members’ relationships with governing bodies, such as the federal government, state government, and local governments. This research will allow for a more comprehensive understanding of how fracking can impact the socio-psychological well-being of the community. View Full-Text
Keywords: hydraulic fracturing; socio-psychological impacts; health; well-being; fracking; community cohesion; community change; othering; us vs. them hydraulic fracturing; socio-psychological impacts; health; well-being; fracking; community cohesion; community change; othering; us vs. them
MDPI and ACS Style

Soyer, M.; Kaminski, K.; Ziyanak, S. Socio-Psychological Impacts of Hydraulic Fracturing on Community Health and Well-Being. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 1186.

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