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Are You Tired of Working amid the Pandemic? The Role of Professional Identity and Job Satisfaction against Job Burnout
Article

Burnout Assessment Tool (BAT)—Development, Validity, and Reliability

1
Research Group Work, Organizational and Personnel Psychology (WOPP), O2L, KU Leuven, 3000 Leuven, Belgium
2
Department of Social and Organizational Psychology, Utrecht University, 3584 CS Utrecht, The Netherlands
3
Optentia Research Focus Area, North-West University, Vanderbijlpark 1900, South Africa
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(24), 9495; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17249495
Received: 11 November 2020 / Revised: 11 December 2020 / Accepted: 16 December 2020 / Published: 18 December 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Burnout as a Public Health Problem and Its Approach from Prevention)
This paper introduces a new definition for burnout and investigates the psychometric properties of the Burnout Assessment Tool (BAT). In a prior qualitative study, 49 practitioners were interviewed about their conceptualization of burnout (part 1). Using a dialectical approach, four core dimensions—exhaustion, mental distance, and impaired emotional and cognitive impairment—and three secondary dimensions—depressed mood, psychological distress, and psychosomatic complaints—emerged, which constitute the basis of the BAT. In the second study, the psychometric characteristics of the BAT were investigated in a representative sample of 1500 Flemish employees, focusing on factorial validity, reliability, and construct validity, respectively. Results demonstrate the assumed four-factor structure for the core dimensions, which is best represented by one general burnout factor. Contrary to expectations, instead of a three-factor structure, a two-factor structure was found for the secondary dimensions. Furthermore, the BAT and its subscales show adequate reliability. Convergent validity and discriminant validity with other burnout measures—including the MBI and OLBI—was demonstrated, as well as discriminant validity with other well-being constructs, such as work engagement and workaholism. View Full-Text
Keywords: burnout; conceptualization; scale development; validation; Burnout Assessment Tool (BAT) burnout; conceptualization; scale development; validation; Burnout Assessment Tool (BAT)
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MDPI and ACS Style

Schaufeli, W.B.; Desart, S.; De Witte, H. Burnout Assessment Tool (BAT)—Development, Validity, and Reliability. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 9495. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17249495

AMA Style

Schaufeli WB, Desart S, De Witte H. Burnout Assessment Tool (BAT)—Development, Validity, and Reliability. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2020; 17(24):9495. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17249495

Chicago/Turabian Style

Schaufeli, Wilmar B., Steffie Desart, and Hans De Witte. 2020. "Burnout Assessment Tool (BAT)—Development, Validity, and Reliability" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 17, no. 24: 9495. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17249495

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