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Article

Impact of Environmental Factors on the Prevalence Changes of Allergic Diseases in Elementary School Students in Ulsan, Korea: A Longitudinal Study

by 1,2,*, 1, 2, 3 and 1,2,*
1
Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Ulsan University Hospital, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Ulsan 44033, Korea
2
Environmental Health Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Ulsan 44033, Korea
3
Department of Informatics, Ewha Womans University Seoul Hospital, Seoul 07804, Korea
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(23), 8831; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17238831
Received: 10 November 2020 / Revised: 21 November 2020 / Accepted: 25 November 2020 / Published: 27 November 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Environment and Children’s Health)
We examined the effect of long-term changes in environmental factors on the prevalence of allergic diseases in elementary school students in Ulsan, Korea. This longitudinal study was conducted among 390 students who were enrolled from three elementary schools in Ulsan in both the first (2009–2010) and second survey (2013–2014). The International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood questionnaire was used to determine the prevalence of allergic diseases and hazardous environmental factors. Generalized estimating equations (GEE) were used to investigate the impact of environmental factors on the change in the prevalence of allergic diseases. The survey revealed that an increased risk of allergic rhinitis was associated with exposure to secondhand smoke, the remodeling of a room, the replacement of wallpaper or flooring, the use of a humidifier, and irritation symptoms of air pollution. Atopic dermatitis was associated with the relocation to or repairs of a new house, and allergic conjunctivitis was associated with low levels of weekly physical activity, the use of insecticides, and irritation symptoms of air pollution. The results indicate that (1) allergic rhinitis and atopic dermatitis are associated with indoor pollution, (2) allergic conjunctivitis is associated with exposure to indoor chemical compounds and low levels of weekly physical activity. This study suggested that the proper evaluation and decrease in the number of environmental risk factors could effectively manage allergic diseases. View Full-Text
Keywords: allergic diseases; prevalence; environmental factors; longitudinal allergic diseases; prevalence; environmental factors; longitudinal
MDPI and ACS Style

Lee, J.; Yun, S.; Oh, I.; Kim, M.-h.; Kim, Y. Impact of Environmental Factors on the Prevalence Changes of Allergic Diseases in Elementary School Students in Ulsan, Korea: A Longitudinal Study. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 8831. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17238831

AMA Style

Lee J, Yun S, Oh I, Kim M-h, Kim Y. Impact of Environmental Factors on the Prevalence Changes of Allergic Diseases in Elementary School Students in Ulsan, Korea: A Longitudinal Study. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2020; 17(23):8831. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17238831

Chicago/Turabian Style

Lee, Jiho, Seokhyun Yun, Inbo Oh, Min-ho Kim, and Yangho Kim. 2020. "Impact of Environmental Factors on the Prevalence Changes of Allergic Diseases in Elementary School Students in Ulsan, Korea: A Longitudinal Study" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 17, no. 23: 8831. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17238831

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