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Impact of Air Pollution on Asthma Outcomes
Open AccessArticle

Lagged Association of Ambient Outdoor Air Pollutants with Asthma-Related Emergency Department Visits within the Pittsburgh Region

1
Department of Environmental and Occupational Health, University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health, Pittsburgh, PA 15261, USA
2
Department of Emergency Medicine, Allegheny Health Network, Pittsburgh, PA 15212, USA
3
Center for Atmospheric Particle Studies and Department of Mechanical Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA 15213, USA
4
Department of Epidemiology, University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health, Pittsburgh, PA 15213, USA
5
Allergy and Asthma Wellness Centers, Butler, PA 16066, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Authors contribute equally to this work.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(22), 8619; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17228619
Received: 1 October 2020 / Revised: 7 November 2020 / Accepted: 11 November 2020 / Published: 20 November 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Occupational and Environmental Asthma)
Asthma affects millions of people globally and is especially concerning in populations living with poor air quality. This study examines the association of ambient outdoor air pollutants on asthma-related emergency department (ED) visits in children and adults throughout the Pittsburgh region. A time-stratified case-crossover design is used to analyze the lagged effects of fine particulate matter (PM2.5) and gaseous pollutants, e.g., ozone (O3), sulfur dioxide (SO2), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), and carbon monoxide (CO) on asthma-related ED visits (n = 6682). Single-, double-, and multi-pollutant models are adjusted for temperature and analyzed using conditional logistic regression. In children, all models show an association between O3 and increased ED visits at lag day 1 (OR: 1.12, 95% CI, 1.03–1.22, p < 0.05) for the double-pollutant model (OR: 1.10, 95% CI: 1.01-1.20, p < 0.01). In adults, the single-pollutant model shows associations between CO and increased ED visits at lag day 5 (OR: 1.13, 95% CI, 1.00–1.28, p < 0.05) and average lag days 0–5 (OR: 1.22, 95% CI: 1.00–1.49, p < 0.05), and for NO2 at lag day 5 (OR: 1.04, 95% CI: 1.00–1.07, p < 0.05). These results show an association between air pollution and asthma morbidity in the Pittsburgh region and underscore the need for mitigation efforts to improve public health outcomes. View Full-Text
Keywords: asthma; pollution; emergency department visits; pediatrics; adults; ozone asthma; pollution; emergency department visits; pediatrics; adults; ozone
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MDPI and ACS Style

Byrwa-Hill, B.M.; Venkat, A.; Presto, A.A.; Rager, J.R.; Gentile, D.; Talbott, E. Lagged Association of Ambient Outdoor Air Pollutants with Asthma-Related Emergency Department Visits within the Pittsburgh Region. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 8619. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17228619

AMA Style

Byrwa-Hill BM, Venkat A, Presto AA, Rager JR, Gentile D, Talbott E. Lagged Association of Ambient Outdoor Air Pollutants with Asthma-Related Emergency Department Visits within the Pittsburgh Region. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2020; 17(22):8619. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17228619

Chicago/Turabian Style

Byrwa-Hill, Brandy M.; Venkat, Arvind; Presto, Albert A.; Rager, Judith R.; Gentile, Deborah; Talbott, Evelyn. 2020. "Lagged Association of Ambient Outdoor Air Pollutants with Asthma-Related Emergency Department Visits within the Pittsburgh Region" Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 17, no. 22: 8619. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17228619

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