Next Article in Journal
Unboxed: US Young Adult Tobacco Users’ Responses to a New Heated Tobacco Product
Next Article in Special Issue
Health and Wellness Impacts of Traditional Physical Activity Experiences on Indigenous Youth: A Systematic Review
Previous Article in Journal
Relationship between the Normative Need for Orthodontic Treatment and Oral Health in Mexican Adolescents Aged 13–15 Years Old
Previous Article in Special Issue
Older Aboriginal Australians’ Health Concerns and Preferences for Healthy Ageing Programs
Article

Maitjara Wangkanyi: Insights from an Ethnographic Study of Food Practices of Households in Remote Australian Aboriginal Communities

1
Ngaanyatjarra Pitjantjatjara Yankunytjatjara (NPY) Women’s Council, Alice Springs NT 0871, Australia
2
School of Public Health, The University of Queensland, Herston QLD 4029, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Ngaanyatjarra Pitjantjatjara Yankunytjatjara (NPY) Women’s Council, Alice Springs NT 0871, Australia
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(21), 8109; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17218109
Received: 16 September 2020 / Revised: 30 October 2020 / Accepted: 30 October 2020 / Published: 3 November 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Indigenous Health Wellbeing)
Many historical, environmental, socioeconomic, political, commercial, and geographic factors underscore the food insecurity and poor diet-related health experienced by Aboriginal people in Australia. Yet, there has been little exploration of Aboriginal food practices or perspectives on food choice recently. This study, with 13 households in remote communities on the Anangu Pitjantjatjara Yankunytjatjara (APY) Lands, fills this gap using ethnographic and Indigenist methods. Results highlight Anangu resourcefulness, securing food despite poverty and adversity, and provide unique insights into factors influencing the three major types and range of dietary patterns identified. These factors include household economic cycles and budgeting challenges; overcrowding and family structures, mobility and ‘organization’; available food storage, preparation and cooking infrastructure; and familiarity and convenience. Structural and systemic reform, respecting Aboriginal leadership, is required to improve food security. View Full-Text
Keywords: Aboriginal; diet; food insecurity; food choice; ethnographic Aboriginal; diet; food insecurity; food choice; ethnographic
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Bryce, S.; Scales, I.; Herron, L.-M.; Wigginton, B.; Lewis, M.; Lee, A.; Ngaanyatjarra Pitjantjatjara Yankunytjatjara Women’s Council. Maitjara Wangkanyi: Insights from an Ethnographic Study of Food Practices of Households in Remote Australian Aboriginal Communities. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 8109. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17218109

AMA Style

Bryce S, Scales I, Herron L-M, Wigginton B, Lewis M, Lee A, Ngaanyatjarra Pitjantjatjara Yankunytjatjara Women’s Council. Maitjara Wangkanyi: Insights from an Ethnographic Study of Food Practices of Households in Remote Australian Aboriginal Communities. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2020; 17(21):8109. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17218109

Chicago/Turabian Style

Bryce, Suzanne, Inawantji Scales, Lisa-Maree Herron, Britta Wigginton, Meron Lewis, Amanda Lee, and Ngaanyatjarra Pitjantjatjara Yankunytjatjara Women’s Council. 2020. "Maitjara Wangkanyi: Insights from an Ethnographic Study of Food Practices of Households in Remote Australian Aboriginal Communities" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 17, no. 21: 8109. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17218109

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop