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Article

Adolescent Tobacco Exposure in 31 Latin American Cities before and after the Framework Convention for Tobacco Control

1
Center for Population Health Research, National Institute of Public Health, Cuernavaca, Morelos 62100, Mexico
2
Dornsife School of Public Health, Urban Health Collaborative, Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA 19129, USA
3
Department of Public Health, School of Medicine, Universidad de Los Andes, 111711 Bogota, Colombia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(20), 7423; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17207423
Received: 17 September 2020 / Revised: 4 October 2020 / Accepted: 6 October 2020 / Published: 12 October 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control)
Our objective was to describe the prevalence and changes in tobacco use and tobacco control policies in Latin American countries and cities before and after ratification of the 2003 Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (FCTC). Country-level tobacco policy data came from reports on the global tobacco epidemic (World Health Organization, 2007–2014). Global Youth Tobacco Survey data, 2000–2011, came from six countries (Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Mexico, Peru), 31 cities and 132,065 students. Pre- and post-FCTC prevalence and relative changes were estimated. All countries showed improvements in tobacco control policies but Mexico and Peru showed the smallest improvements. In general, adolescents reduced their tobacco use, reported less exposure to smoking at home, more tobacco education, and more retailer refusals to sell them cigarettes. Adolescents reported smaller reductions in secondhand smoke exposure outside the home and no change in exposure to tobacco media/promotions. Pre-FCTC prevalence and relative changes during the post-FCTC period were more heterogeneous across cities than across countries. Despite overall improvements in tobacco policies and the decline in exposure to tobacco, policies related to media/promotions and secondhand smoke need strengthening. There was wide variation in adolescent exposure to tobacco between cities (within countries), which suggested major heterogeneity of policy implementation at the local level. View Full-Text
Keywords: population surveillance; tobacco; health policy; Latin America; smoking prevention; adolescent behavior; smoke-free policy; tobacco industry population surveillance; tobacco; health policy; Latin America; smoking prevention; adolescent behavior; smoke-free policy; tobacco industry
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MDPI and ACS Style

Prado-Galbarro, F.-J.; Auchincloss, A.H.; Pérez-Ferrer, C.; Sanchez-Franco, S.; Barrientos-Gutierrez, T. Adolescent Tobacco Exposure in 31 Latin American Cities before and after the Framework Convention for Tobacco Control. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 7423. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17207423

AMA Style

Prado-Galbarro F-J, Auchincloss AH, Pérez-Ferrer C, Sanchez-Franco S, Barrientos-Gutierrez T. Adolescent Tobacco Exposure in 31 Latin American Cities before and after the Framework Convention for Tobacco Control. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2020; 17(20):7423. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17207423

Chicago/Turabian Style

Prado-Galbarro, Francisco-Javier, Amy H. Auchincloss, Carolina Pérez-Ferrer, Sharon Sanchez-Franco, and Tonatiuh Barrientos-Gutierrez. 2020. "Adolescent Tobacco Exposure in 31 Latin American Cities before and after the Framework Convention for Tobacco Control" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 17, no. 20: 7423. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17207423

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