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Open AccessArticle

Incidence and Risk Factors for Severe Dehydration in Hospitalized Children in Ujjain, India

1
Department of Pediatrics, Gardi Medical College, Ujjain 456006, India
2
Global Health-Health Systems and Policy: Medicines, Focusing Antibiotics, Department of Global Public Health, Karolinska Institutet, 171 77 Stockholm, Sweden
3
Department of Women and Children’s Health, International Maternal and Child Health Unit, Uppsala University, 753 27 Uppsala, Sweden
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(2), 616; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17020616
Received: 15 December 2019 / Revised: 15 January 2020 / Accepted: 16 January 2020 / Published: 18 January 2020
(This article belongs to the Section Infectious Disease Epidemiology)
Diarrhoea contributes significantly to the under-five childhood morbidity and mortality worldwide. This cross-sectional study was carried out in a tertiary care hospital in Ujjain, India from July 2015 to June 2016. Consecutive children aged 1 month to 12 years having “some dehydration” and “dehydration” according to World Health Organization classification were eligible to be included in the study. Other signs and symptoms used to assess severe dehydration were capillary refill time, urine output, and abnormal respiratory pattern. A questionnaire was administered to identify risk factors for severe dehydration, which was the primary outcome. Multivariate logistic regression modeling was used to detect independent risk factors for severe dehydration. The study included 332 children, with mean ± standard deviation age of 25.62 ± 31.85 months; out of which, 70% (95% confidence interval [CI] 65 to 75) were diagnosed to have severe dehydration. The independent risk factors for severe dehydration were: child not exclusive breastfed in the first six months of life (AOR 5.67, 95%CI 2.51 to 12.78; p < 0.001), history of not receiving oral rehydration solution before hospitalization (AOR 1.34, 95%CI 1.01 to 1.78; p = 0.038), history of not receiving oral zinc before hospitalization (AOR 2.66, 95%CI 1.68 to 4.21; p < 0.001) and living in overcrowded conditions (AOR 5.52, 95%CI 2.19 to 13.93; p < 0.001). The study identified many risk factors associated with severe childhood dehydration; many of them are modifiable though known and effective public health interventions. View Full-Text
Keywords: diarrhoea; severity; severe dehydration; children; risk factors; Ujjain; India diarrhoea; severity; severe dehydration; children; risk factors; Ujjain; India
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MDPI and ACS Style

Sharma, A.; Mathur, A.; Stålsby Lundborg, C.; Pathak, A. Incidence and Risk Factors for Severe Dehydration in Hospitalized Children in Ujjain, India. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 616. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17020616

AMA Style

Sharma A, Mathur A, Stålsby Lundborg C, Pathak A. Incidence and Risk Factors for Severe Dehydration in Hospitalized Children in Ujjain, India. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2020; 17(2):616. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17020616

Chicago/Turabian Style

Sharma, Abhishek; Mathur, Aditya; Stålsby Lundborg, Cecilia; Pathak, Ashish. 2020. "Incidence and Risk Factors for Severe Dehydration in Hospitalized Children in Ujjain, India" Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 17, no. 2: 616. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17020616

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