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Contextualizing Evidence for Action on Diabetes in Low-Resource Settings—Project CEAD Part I: A Mixed-Methods Study Protocol

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CIBER de Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP), 28029 Madrid, Spain
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Department of Public Health, Universidad Miguel Hernández, 03550 Sant Joan d’Alacant, Alicante, Spain
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Faculty of Medicine, Pontificia Universidad Católica del Ecuador (PUCE), Quito 170143, Ecuador
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Institute of Public Health, Pontificia Universidad Católica del Ecuador (PUCE), Quito 170143, Ecuador
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Centre of Community Epidemiology and Tropical Medicine (CECOMET), Esmeraldas 0801265, Ecuador
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School of Medical Specialities, Colegio de Ciencias de la Salud, Universidad San Francisco de Quito (USFQ), Quito 170901, Ecuador
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Faculty of Nursing, Pontificia Universidad Católica del Ecuador (PUCE), Quito 170143, Ecuador
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(2), 569; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17020569
Received: 10 December 2019 / Revised: 7 January 2020 / Accepted: 8 January 2020 / Published: 16 January 2020
(This article belongs to the Section Global Health)
Challenges remain for policy adoption and implementation to tackle the unprecedented and relentless increase in obesity, diabetes and other non-communicable diseases (NCDs), especially in low- and middle-income countries. The aim of this mixed-methods study is to analyse the contextual relevance and applicability to low-resource settings of a sample of evidence-based healthy public policies, using local knowledge, perceptions and pertinent epidemiological data. Firstly, we will identify and prioritise policies that have the potential to reduce the burden of diabetes in low-resource settings with a scoping review and modified Delphi method. In parallel, we will undertake two cross-sectional population surveys on diabetes risk and morbidity in two low-resource settings in Ecuador. Patients, community members, health workers and policy makers will analyse the contextual relevance and applicability of the policy actions and discuss their potential for the reduction in inequities in diabetes risk and morbidity in their population. This study tackles one of the greatest challenges in global health today: how to drive the implementation of population-wide preventative measures to fight NCDs in low resource settings. The findings will demonstrate how local knowledge, perceptions and pertinent epidemiological data can be used to analyse the contextual relevance and applicability of potential policy actions. View Full-Text
Keywords: diabetes mellitus; type 2 diabetes; primary prevention; public policy; public health; implementation science diabetes mellitus; type 2 diabetes; primary prevention; public policy; public health; implementation science
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Chilet-Rosell, E.; Piay, N.; Hernández-Aguado, I.; Lumbreras, B.; Barrera-Guarderas, F.; Torres-Castillo, A.L.; Caicedo-Montaño, C.; Montalvo-Villacis, G.; Blasco-Blasco, M.; Rivadeneira, M.F.; Pastor-Valero, M.; Márquez-Figueroa, M.; Vásconez, J.F.; Parker, L.A. Contextualizing Evidence for Action on Diabetes in Low-Resource Settings—Project CEAD Part I: A Mixed-Methods Study Protocol. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 569.

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