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Open AccessArticle

Open Campus Policies: How Built, Food, Social, and Organizational Environments Matter for Oregon’s Public High School Students’ Health

1
Department of Counseling Psychology and Human Services, College of Education, University of Oregon, 5461 University of Oregon, Eugene, OR 97403, USA
2
Department of Sociology, College of Arts and Sciences, University of Oregon, 1291 University of Oregon, Eugene, OR 97403, USA
3
Morgridge College of Education, University of Denver, 1999 E. Evans Avenue, Denver, CO 80208, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(2), 469; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17020469
Received: 27 November 2019 / Revised: 1 January 2020 / Accepted: 4 January 2020 / Published: 10 January 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Child Nutrition Management)
Open campus policies that grant access to the off-campus food environment may influence U.S. high school students’ exposure to unhealthy foods, yet predictors of these policies are unknown. Policy holding and built (walkability), food (access to grocery stores), social (school-to-neighborhood demographic similarity), and organizational (policy holding of neighboring schools) environment data were collected for 200 Oregon public high schools. These existing data were derived from the Oregon School Board Association, WalkScore.com, the 2010 Decennial Census, the 2010–2014 American Community Survey, the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, TDLinex, Nielson directories, the U.S. Department of Education, the National Center for Education Statistics, and the Common Core of Data. Most (67%) of Oregon public high schools have open campus policies. Logistic regression analyses modeled open campus policy holding as a function of built, food, social, and organizational environment influences. With health and policy implications, the results indicate that the schools’ walkability, food access, and extent of neighboring open campus policy-schools are significantly associated with open campus policy holding in Oregon. View Full-Text
Keywords: schools; youth; policy; built environment; food environment; social environment; organizational environment schools; youth; policy; built environment; food environment; social environment; organizational environment
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Budd, E.L.; Liévanos, R.S.; Amidon, B. Open Campus Policies: How Built, Food, Social, and Organizational Environments Matter for Oregon’s Public High School Students’ Health. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 469.

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