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Prevalence, Determinants, and Effects of Food Insecurity among Middle Eastern and North African Migrants and Refugees in High-Income Countries: A Systematic Review

by 1,*, 1,2 and 1,2,3,4
1
School of Health Sciences, Western Sydney University, Campbelltown Campus, Penrith, NSW 2751, Australia
2
Translational Health Research Institute, Western Sydney University, Penrith, NSW 2751, Australia
3
Discipline of Child and Adolescent Health, Sydney Medical School, Faculty of Medicine and Health, The University of Sydney, Westmead, NSW 2145, Australia
4
Oral Health Services, Sydney Local Health District and Sydney Dental Hospital, NSW Health, Surry Hills, NSW 2010, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(19), 7262; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17197262
Received: 20 August 2020 / Revised: 20 September 2020 / Accepted: 29 September 2020 / Published: 4 October 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Health and Wellbeing of Migrant Populations)
Issues related to poverty and income inequality in high-income countries have led to food insecurity among some population groups, such as migrants and refugees. While there are some studies on the experience of some migrant groups (and other subpopulations), little is known about food security among Middle Eastern and African migrants and refugees. This systematic review identified the prevalence of food insecurity and its effects among Middle Eastern and North African (MENA) migrants and refugees in high-income countries. The Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines were followed in this systematic review. Four databases, namely MEDLINE (Ovid), Embase (Ovid), CINAHL (EBSCO), and PubMed were searched. Three studies met the inclusion criteria, all of which were conducted in USA: two among Sudanese migrant families, and one among Somali refugee women. The rates of reported food insecurity ranged from 40% to 71% and were significantly higher than for the general population. Food insecurity was associated with acculturation and socio-economic factors. Food insecurity adversely impacts the health of MENA migrants and refugees, creating economic implications for individuals, families, the broader community in which they now live, and for governments. View Full-Text
Keywords: food security; food insecurity; Middle Eastern; North African; MENA; migrants; refugees food security; food insecurity; Middle Eastern; North African; MENA; migrants; refugees
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MDPI and ACS Style

Mansour, R.; Liamputtong, P.; Arora, A. Prevalence, Determinants, and Effects of Food Insecurity among Middle Eastern and North African Migrants and Refugees in High-Income Countries: A Systematic Review. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 7262. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17197262

AMA Style

Mansour R, Liamputtong P, Arora A. Prevalence, Determinants, and Effects of Food Insecurity among Middle Eastern and North African Migrants and Refugees in High-Income Countries: A Systematic Review. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2020; 17(19):7262. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17197262

Chicago/Turabian Style

Mansour, Reima; Liamputtong, Pranee; Arora, Amit. 2020. "Prevalence, Determinants, and Effects of Food Insecurity among Middle Eastern and North African Migrants and Refugees in High-Income Countries: A Systematic Review" Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 17, no. 19: 7262. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17197262

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