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Open AccessProtocol

Go Zika Go: A Feasibility Protocol of a Modified Ride-on Car Intervention for Children with Congenital Zika Syndrome in Brazil

1
Postgraduate Program in Rehabilitation Sciences and Postgraduate Program in Collective Health, Federal University of Rio Grande do Norte—Faculty of Health Sciences of Trairi (UFRN-FACISA), Santa Cruz 59200-000, Brazil
2
Department of Physical Therapy, Federal University of São Carlos, São Carlos 13565-905, Brazil
3
Postgraduate Program in Rehabilitation Sciences, Federal University of Rio Grande do Norte—Faculty of Health Sciences of Trairi (UFRN-FACISA), Santa Cruz 59200-000, Brazil
4
Postgraduate Program in Collective Health, Federal University of Rio Grande do Norte—Faculty of Health Sciences of Trairi (UFRN-FACISA), Santa Cruz 59200-000, Brazil
5
College of Public Health and Human Sciences, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(18), 6875; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17186875
Received: 15 August 2020 / Revised: 9 September 2020 / Accepted: 10 September 2020 / Published: 21 September 2020
Children with congenital Zika syndrome (CZS) present severe motor disability and can benefit from early powered mobility. The Go Zika Go project uses modified ride-on toy cars, which may advance the body functions, activities, and participation of children. This paper describes the study protocol aiming to assess the feasibility of a modified ride-on car intervention for children with CZS in Brazil. A mixed-methods design with a multiple 1-week baseline, 3-month intervention, and 1-month follow-up will be implemented. Modified ride-on car training sessions will be conducted three times a week at the participants’ home or in the clinic. The primary outcome will be a narrative description of study feasibility (photovoice method, focus groups, parent feasibility questionnaire and assessment of learning powered mobility). Secondary outcomes will be switch activation, driving sessions journal, social-cognitive interactions, mobility (pediatric evaluation of disability inventory computer adaptive test), goal attainment scaling (GAS), and participation (young children’s participation and environment measure). Go Zika Go is expected to be viable and to improve function, activity, and participation of children with CZS, providing a low-cost, evidence-based rehabilitation option that will be relevant to early child development in a global perspective. View Full-Text
Keywords: congenital Zika syndrome; user participation; mobility; intervention congenital Zika syndrome; user participation; mobility; intervention
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Longo, E.; De Campos, A.C.; Spinola Barreto, A.; Lima Nascimento Coutinho, D.L.; Leite Galvão Coelho, M.; Corsi, C.; Souza Monteiro, K.; Logan, S.W. Go Zika Go: A Feasibility Protocol of a Modified Ride-on Car Intervention for Children with Congenital Zika Syndrome in Brazil. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 6875.

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