Next Article in Journal
Mapping the Finer-Scale Carcinogenic Risk of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) in Urban Soil—A Case Study of Shenzhen City, China
Next Article in Special Issue
A Qualitative Study of a Mindfulness-Based Intervention in Educational Contexts in Chile: An Approach Based on Adolescents’ Voices
Previous Article in Journal
Reliability of the Resonance Frequency Analysis Values in New Prototype Transepithelial Abutments: A Prospective Clinical Study
Previous Article in Special Issue
Assessment of Alcohol Consumption and Anxiety as Predictors of Risk of Anorexia and Bulimia in Non-Clinicals Samples
Open AccessArticle

The Impacts of Air Pollution on Mental Health: Evidence from the Chinese University Students

1
School of Foreign Studies, China University of Mining and Technology (Xuzhou), Xuzhou 221116, China
2
Centre for Australian Studies, School of Foreign Studies, China University of Mining and Technology (Xuzhou), Xuzhou 221116, China
3
School of English Culture and Literature, Beijing International Studies University, Beijing 100024, China
4
School of Economics and Management, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092, China
5
Business School, Teesside University, Middlesbrough TS1 3BA, UK
6
Bartlett School of Planning, University College London, London WC1H 0NN, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(18), 6734; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17186734
Received: 7 July 2020 / Revised: 9 September 2020 / Accepted: 9 September 2020 / Published: 16 September 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Mental Health of Child and Young People)
A growing number of developing countries have experienced worsening air pollution, which has been shown to cause significant health problems. However, few studies have explored the impact of air pollution on the mental health of university students, particularly in the Chinese context. In order to address this gap, through a large-scale cross-sectional survey, this study aims to examine the effects of air pollution on final-year Chinese university undergraduates’ (due to graduate in 2020) mental health by employing multivariable logistic regression. Our findings show that, first, although normal air quality is not strongly associated with lower levels of negative mental health, there is a strong link between poor air quality and higher levels of negative mental health. More specifically, life satisfaction hedonic unhappiness and depression measured by the Centre for Epidemiological Studies’ Depression scale (CES-D) are statistically associated with air pollution. In addition, we also found that gender is a significant factor, as males had more than 1.6 times greater odds of increased mental health problems compared to their female counterparts. Place of birth also plays a significant role in participants’ mental health. Moreover, undergraduates with urban household registration experienced significant levels of hedonic unhappiness and depression on the CES-D scale. Finally, we found that there is an association between respondents’ economic situation and their mental health too. Overall, this study contributes to the research on air pollution management and mental health intervention, particularly in relation to student groups. The undergraduate curriculum should provide more guidance and suggestions on promoting mental health and establishing positive attitudes to life and academic study of the final year students, under the context of air pollution in China. View Full-Text
Keywords: air pollution; mental health; well-being; life satisfaction; undergraduate students; China air pollution; mental health; well-being; life satisfaction; undergraduate students; China
MDPI and ACS Style

Zu, D.; Zhai, K.; Qiu, Y.; Pei, P.; Zhu, X.; Han, D. The Impacts of Air Pollution on Mental Health: Evidence from the Chinese University Students. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 6734.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop