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Open AccessArticle

Different Movement Strategies in the Countermovement Jump Amongst a Large Cohort of NBA Players

1
Peak Performance Project, Santa Barbara, CA 93101, USA
2
Laboratory of Adaptations to Strength Training, Escola de Educação Física e Esporte, Universidade de Sao Paulo, São Paulo 05508-060, Brazil
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(17), 6394; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17176394
Received: 21 July 2020 / Revised: 28 August 2020 / Accepted: 31 August 2020 / Published: 2 September 2020
Previous research has demonstrated large amounts of inter-subject variability in downward (unweighting & braking) phase strategies in the countermovement jump (CMJ). The purpose of this study was to characterize downward phase strategies and associated temporal, kinematic and kinetic CMJ variables. One hundred and seventy-eight NBA (National Basketball Association) players (23.6 ± 3.7 years, 200.3 ± 8.0 cm; 99.4 ± 11.7 kg; CMJ height 68.7 ± 7.4 cm) performed three maximal CMJs. Force plate and 3D motion capture data were integrated to obtain kinematic and kinetic outputs. Afterwards, athletes were split into clusters based on downward phase characteristics (k-means cluster analysis). Lower limb joint angular displacement (i.e., delta flexion) explained the highest portion of point variability (89.3%), and three clusters were recommended (Ball Hall Index). Delta flexion was significantly different between clusters and players were characterized as “stiff flexors”, “hyper flexors”, or “hip flexors”. There were no significant differences in jump height between clusters (p > 0.05). Multiple regression analyses indicated that most of the jumping height variance was explained by the same four variables, (i.e., sum concentric relative force, knee extension velocity, knee extension acceleration, and height) regardless of the cluster (p < 0.05). However, each cluster had its own unique set of secondary predictor variables. View Full-Text
Keywords: NBA; CMJ; biomechanics; 3-D motion capture; cluster analysis NBA; CMJ; biomechanics; 3-D motion capture; cluster analysis
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MDPI and ACS Style

Rauch, J.; Leidersdorf, E.; Reeves, T.; Borkan, L.; Elliott, M.; Ugrinowitsch, C. Different Movement Strategies in the Countermovement Jump Amongst a Large Cohort of NBA Players. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 6394.

AMA Style

Rauch J, Leidersdorf E, Reeves T, Borkan L, Elliott M, Ugrinowitsch C. Different Movement Strategies in the Countermovement Jump Amongst a Large Cohort of NBA Players. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2020; 17(17):6394.

Chicago/Turabian Style

Rauch, Jacob; Leidersdorf, Eric; Reeves, Trent; Borkan, Leah; Elliott, Marcus; Ugrinowitsch, Carlos. 2020. "Different Movement Strategies in the Countermovement Jump Amongst a Large Cohort of NBA Players" Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 17, no. 17: 6394.

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