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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle

Key Factors Related to Short Course 100 m Breaststroke Performance

Department of Physical Performance, Norwegian School of Sport Sciences, 0863 Oslo, Norway
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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(17), 6257; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17176257
Received: 21 July 2020 / Revised: 24 August 2020 / Accepted: 24 August 2020 / Published: 27 August 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Health, Training and Performance in Aquatic Activities and Exercises)
Background and aim: To identify kinematic variables related to short course 100 m breaststroke performance. Methods: An automatic race analysis system was utilized to obtain start (0–15 m), turn (5 m before the wall until 10 m out), finish (95–100 m), and clean swimming (the rest of the race) segment times as well as cycle rate and cycle length during each swimming cycle from 15 male swimmers during a 100 m breaststroke race. A bivariate correlation and a partial correlation were employed to assess the relationship between each variable and swimming time. Results: Turns were the largest time contributor to the finishing time (44.30 ± 0.58%), followed by clean swimming (38.93 ± 0.50%), start (11.39 ± 0.22%), and finish (5.36 ± 0.18%). The finishing time was correlated (p < 0.001) with start segment time (r = 0.979), clean swimming time (r = 0.940), and 10 m turn-out time (r = 0.829). The clean swimming time was associated with the finishing time, but cycle rate and cycle length were not. In both start and turns, the peak velocity (i.e., take-off and push-off velocity) and the transition velocity were related to the segment time (r ≤ −0.673, p ≤ 0.006). Conclusions: Breaststroke training should focus on: (I) 15 m start with generating high take-off velocity, (II) improving clean swimming velocity by finding an optimal balance between cycle length and rate, (III) 10 m turn-out with maintaining a strong wall push-off, and (IV) establishing a high transition velocity from underwater to surface swimming. View Full-Text
Keywords: swimming race analysis; automatic; kinematics; segments; techniques swimming race analysis; automatic; kinematics; segments; techniques
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MDPI and ACS Style

Olstad, B.H.; Wathne, H.; Gonjo, T. Key Factors Related to Short Course 100 m Breaststroke Performance. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 6257. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17176257

AMA Style

Olstad BH, Wathne H, Gonjo T. Key Factors Related to Short Course 100 m Breaststroke Performance. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2020; 17(17):6257. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17176257

Chicago/Turabian Style

Olstad, Bjørn H.; Wathne, Henrik; Gonjo, Tomohiro. 2020. "Key Factors Related to Short Course 100 m Breaststroke Performance" Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 17, no. 17: 6257. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17176257

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