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Article

Weather Conditions and Outdoor Fall Injuries in Northwestern Russia

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Department of Community Medicine, UiT The Arctic University of Norway, N-9037 Tromsø, Norway
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Arkhangelsk International School of Public Health, Troitsky Ave., 51, Northern State Medical University, 163000 Arkhangelsk, Russia
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Al-Farabi Kazakh National University, Almaty 050040, Kazakhstan
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West Kazakhstan Marat Ospanov State Medical University, Aktobe 030019, Kazakhstan
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Sechenov First Moscow State Medical University (Sechenov University), 119991 Moscow, Russia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(17), 6096; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17176096
Received: 10 July 2020 / Revised: 17 August 2020 / Accepted: 18 August 2020 / Published: 21 August 2020
(This article belongs to the Section Climate Change)
This study aimed to investigate associations between the weather conditions and the frequency of medically-treated, non-fatal accidental outdoor fall injuries (AOFIs) in a provincial region of Northwestern Russia. Data on all non-fatal AOFIs that occurred from January 2015 through June 2018 (N = 1125) were extracted from the population-based Shenkursk Injury Registry (SHIR). Associations between the weather conditions and AOFIs were investigated separately for the cold (15 October–14 April) and the warm (15 April–14 October) seasons. Negative binomial regression was used to investigate daily numbers of AOFIs in the cold season, while zero-inflated Poisson regression was used for the warm season. The mean daily number of AOFIs was 1.7 times higher in the cold season compared to the warm season (1.10 vs. 0.65, respectively). The most typical accident mechanism in the cold season was slipping (83%), whereas stepping wrong or stumbling over something was most common (49%) in the warm season. The highest mean daily incidence of AOFIs in the cold season (20.2 per 100,000 population) was observed on days when the ground surface was covered by compact or wet snow, air temperature ranged from −7.0 °C to −0.7 °C, and the amount of precipitation was above 0.4 mm. In the warm season, the highest mean daily incidence (7.0 per 100,000 population) was observed when the air temperature and atmospheric pressure were between 9.0 °C and 15.1 °C and 1003.6 to 1010.9 hPa, respectively. Along with local weather forecasts, broadcasting warnings about the increased risks of outdoor falls may serve as an effective AOFI prevention tool. View Full-Text
Keywords: outdoor fall injuries; injury registry; weather conditions; Shenkursk outdoor fall injuries; injury registry; weather conditions; Shenkursk
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MDPI and ACS Style

Unguryanu, T.N.; Grjibovski, A.M.; Trovik, T.A.; Ytterstad, B.; Kudryavtsev, A.V. Weather Conditions and Outdoor Fall Injuries in Northwestern Russia. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 6096. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17176096

AMA Style

Unguryanu TN, Grjibovski AM, Trovik TA, Ytterstad B, Kudryavtsev AV. Weather Conditions and Outdoor Fall Injuries in Northwestern Russia. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2020; 17(17):6096. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17176096

Chicago/Turabian Style

Unguryanu, Tatiana N., Andrej M. Grjibovski, Tordis A. Trovik, Børge Ytterstad, and Alexander V. Kudryavtsev 2020. "Weather Conditions and Outdoor Fall Injuries in Northwestern Russia" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 17, no. 17: 6096. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17176096

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