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Article

The Use of Partial Least Squares–Path Modelling to Understand the Impact of Ambivalent Sexism on Violence-Justification among Adolescents

1
Department of Social Science, University of Naples “Federico II”, 80138 Naples, Italy
2
Department of Economics and Statistics, University of Naples “Federico II”, 80126 Naples, Italy
3
Institute for Socio-Psychological Training, Research and Sexual Education, 80127 Naples, Italy
4
Istituto Nazionale di Statistica, 00184 Rome, Italy
5
Department of Humanities, University of Naples “Federico II”, 80138 Naples, Italy
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(14), 4991; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17144991
Received: 4 June 2020 / Revised: 4 July 2020 / Accepted: 7 July 2020 / Published: 10 July 2020
Gender violence is generally conceived as a phenomenon concerning only adults. Nonetheless, it is also perpetrated within teenagers’ relationships, as many empirical studies have shown. We therefore have focused our attention on a non-probabilistic sample consisting of 400 adolescents living in Naples (Italy), to study the association between sexism and the justification of violent attitudes. Generally, sexism is recognised as a discriminatory attitude towards people, based on their biological sex. However, it is conventional to talk about sexism as a prejudice against women. The Ambivalent Sexism Inventory (ASI) for adolescents was used to evaluate the two dimensions of ambivalent sexism, i.e., hostile sexism (HS) and benevolent sexism (BS). Moreover, the questionnaire regarding attitudes towards diversity and violence (CADV) was administered to assess participants’ attitudes towards violence. A Partial Least Square–Second Order Path Model reveals that girls’ ambivalent sexism is affected more by benevolent sexism than hostile sexism. On the contrary, among boys, hostile sexism has a higher impact. Finally, benevolent sexist girls justify domestic violence more than boys do. View Full-Text
Keywords: adolescents; sexism; violence legitimation; Partial Least Squares–Path Modelling adolescents; sexism; violence legitimation; Partial Least Squares–Path Modelling
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MDPI and ACS Style

Fasanelli, R.; Galli, I.; Grassia, M.G.; Marino, M.; Cataldo, R.; Lauro, C.N.; Castiello, C.; Grassia, F.; Arcidiacono, C.; Procentese, F. The Use of Partial Least Squares–Path Modelling to Understand the Impact of Ambivalent Sexism on Violence-Justification among Adolescents. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 4991. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17144991

AMA Style

Fasanelli R, Galli I, Grassia MG, Marino M, Cataldo R, Lauro CN, Castiello C, Grassia F, Arcidiacono C, Procentese F. The Use of Partial Least Squares–Path Modelling to Understand the Impact of Ambivalent Sexism on Violence-Justification among Adolescents. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2020; 17(14):4991. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17144991

Chicago/Turabian Style

Fasanelli, Roberto, Ida Galli, Maria G. Grassia, Marina Marino, Rosanna Cataldo, Carlo N. Lauro, Chiara Castiello, Filomena Grassia, Caterina Arcidiacono, and Fortuna Procentese. 2020. "The Use of Partial Least Squares–Path Modelling to Understand the Impact of Ambivalent Sexism on Violence-Justification among Adolescents" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 17, no. 14: 4991. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17144991

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