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Open AccessArticle

Crying Therapy Intervention for Breast Cancer Survivors: Development and Effects

1
School of Nursing, Yeungnam University College, Daegu 42415, Korea
2
Department of Nursing, Daegu University, Daegu 42400, Korea
3
Department of Nursing, Dongyang University, Kyungpook 36040, Korea
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(13), 4911; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17134911
Received: 6 June 2020 / Revised: 1 July 2020 / Accepted: 3 July 2020 / Published: 7 July 2020
(This article belongs to the Section Women's Health)
Background: crying therapy is currently being applied in some countries to treat cancer patients, manage pain, and promote mental health. However, little nursing and medical research on the effects of crying therapy has been conducted in other parts of the world. This study aimed to develop a crying therapy program for breast cancer survivors and assess its effects. Interventions/method: data from 27 breast cancer survivors in South Korea were analyzed. The intervention, employing a single group, pre-post-test quasi-experimental design, was divided into three phases, and effects were verified for emotional (distress, fatigue, and mood conditions) and physiological (cortisol, immunoglobulin G, and blood pressure) variables. Results: there were significant changes in distress, mood changes, and immunoglobulin G and smaller changes in blood pressure postintervention. Fatigue and cortisol showed no significant changes. Conclusions: this study demonstrated the effectiveness of a short-term crying therapy program that can induce positive emotional changes and physiological effects in breast cancer survivors. This intervention can improve quality of life, indicating its value as a self-care program for cancer survivors. View Full-Text
Keywords: crying therapy intervention; breast cancer; quasi-experiment; stress alleviation; positive emotional change crying therapy intervention; breast cancer; quasi-experiment; stress alleviation; positive emotional change
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MDPI and ACS Style

Byun, H.-S.; Hwang, H.; Kim, G.-D. Crying Therapy Intervention for Breast Cancer Survivors: Development and Effects. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 4911. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17134911

AMA Style

Byun H-S, Hwang H, Kim G-D. Crying Therapy Intervention for Breast Cancer Survivors: Development and Effects. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2020; 17(13):4911. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17134911

Chicago/Turabian Style

Byun, Hye-Sun; Hwang, Hyenam; Kim, Gyung-Duck. 2020. "Crying Therapy Intervention for Breast Cancer Survivors: Development and Effects" Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 17, no. 13: 4911. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17134911

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