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Article

Associations between the Home Environment, Feeding Practices and Children’s Intakes of Fruit, Vegetables and Confectionary/Sugar-Sweetened Beverages

1
School of Biological and Health Sciences, Technological University Dublin, City Campus, Kevin Street, Dublin 8, Ireland
2
School of Public Health, Physiotherapy and Sports Science, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4, Ireland
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(13), 4837; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17134837
Received: 2 June 2020 / Revised: 30 June 2020 / Accepted: 2 July 2020 / Published: 5 July 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Parenting, Feeding and Child Eating Behaviors: A Complex Interplay)
Within the home environment, parents influence their children’s dietary intakes through their parenting and dietary practices, and the foods they make available/accessible. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to examine the associations between home environmental characteristics and children’s dietary intakes. Three hundred and thirty-two children aged three–five years and their parents participated in the study. Home environmental characteristics, including parental control feeding practices, were explored using validated and standardized questionnaires such as the Child Feeding Questionnaire (CFQ), the Physical and Nutritional Home Environment Inventory (PNHEI) and the Healthy Home Survey (HHS). Parent and child food consumption was also measured. Pressure to eat from parents was associated with lower fruit intake in children (OR 0.67, 95% CI 0.47–0.96, p = 0.032). Greater variety of fruit available in the home increased the likelihood of fruit consumption in children (OR 1.35 95% CI 1.09–1.68, p = 0.005). Watching television for ≥1 h per day was associated with a decreased probability of children eating vegetables daily (OR 0.38, 95% CI 0.20–0.72, p = 0.003) and doubled their likelihood of consuming confectionary/sugar-sweetened beverages more than once weekly (OR 2.15, 95% CI 1.06–4.38, p = 0.034). Children whose parents had lower vegetable consumption were 59% less likely to eat vegetables daily. This study demonstrates that modifiable home environmental characteristics are significantly associated with children’s dietary intakes. View Full-Text
Keywords: children’s diet; home environment; feeding practices children’s diet; home environment; feeding practices
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MDPI and ACS Style

Bassul, C.; A. Corish, C.; M. Kearney, J. Associations between the Home Environment, Feeding Practices and Children’s Intakes of Fruit, Vegetables and Confectionary/Sugar-Sweetened Beverages. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 4837. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17134837

AMA Style

Bassul C, A. Corish C, M. Kearney J. Associations between the Home Environment, Feeding Practices and Children’s Intakes of Fruit, Vegetables and Confectionary/Sugar-Sweetened Beverages. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2020; 17(13):4837. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17134837

Chicago/Turabian Style

Bassul, Carolina, Clare A. Corish, and John M. Kearney. 2020. "Associations between the Home Environment, Feeding Practices and Children’s Intakes of Fruit, Vegetables and Confectionary/Sugar-Sweetened Beverages" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 17, no. 13: 4837. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17134837

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