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Open AccessArticle

Canadian Public Safety Personnel and Occupational Stressors: How PSP Interpret Stressors on Duty

1
Department of Sociology, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John’s, NL A1C 5S7, Canada
2
Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering/Discipline of Emergency Medicine, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John’s, NL A1B 3X5, Canada
3
Department of Psychology, University of Regina, Regina, SK S4S 0A2, Canada
4
Department of Justice Studies, University of Regina, Regina, SK S4S 0A2, Canada
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(13), 4736; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17134736
Received: 10 May 2020 / Revised: 5 June 2020 / Accepted: 12 June 2020 / Published: 1 July 2020
Canadian public safety personnel (e.g., correctional workers, firefighters) experience potential stressors as a function of their occupation. Occupational stressors can include organizational (e.g., job context) and operational (e.g., job content) elements. Operational stressors (e.g., exposures to potentially psychologically traumatic events) may be inevitable, but opportunities may exist to mitigate other occupational stressors for public safety personnel. Research exploring the diverse forms of stress among public safety personnel remains sparse. In our current qualitative study we provide insights into how public safety personnel interpret occupational stressors. We use a semi-grounded thematic approach to analyze what public safety personnel reported when asked to further comment on occupational stress or their work experiences in two open-ended comment fields of an online survey. We provide a more comprehensive understanding of how public safety personnel experience occupational stress and the stressors that are unique to their occupations. Beyond known operational stressors, our respondents (n = 1238; n = 828) reported substantial difficulties with organizational (interpersonal work relationship dynamics; workload distribution, resources, and administrative obligations) and operational (vigilance, work location, interacting with the public) stressors. Some operational stressors are inevitable, but other occupational stressors can be mitigated to better support our public safety personnel. View Full-Text
Keywords: public safety personnel; occupational stress; organizational stress; operational stress public safety personnel; occupational stress; organizational stress; operational stress
MDPI and ACS Style

Ricciardelli, R.; Czarnuch, S.; Carleton, R.N.; Gacek, J.; Shewmake, J. Canadian Public Safety Personnel and Occupational Stressors: How PSP Interpret Stressors on Duty. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 4736.

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