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Eat to Live, Don’t Live to Eat: Black Men, Masculinity, Faith and Food
Open AccessArticle

“Can I Live”: Black American Adolescent Boys’ Reports of Police Abuse and the Role of Religiosity on Mental Health

1
George Warren Brown School of Social Work, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, MO 63130, USA
2
College of Public Health and Social Justice, Saint Louis University, St. Louis, MO 63104, USA
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(12), 4330; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17124330
Received: 20 April 2020 / Revised: 31 May 2020 / Accepted: 12 June 2020 / Published: 17 June 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Stress, Faith, Resiliency, and Health among Black Men)
State sanctioned violence aimed at Black individuals and communities is an issue that has pervaded American history and society since before the establishment of the United States. For Black males, anticipating and preparing for involuntary police contact, unfortunately, is an inevitable part of life. The purpose of this study is to examine the impact of reports of police abuse on mental health and perceived racial out-group perceptions and the protective role of religiosity among a nationally representative sample of Black American adolescent boys (Mage = 14.98). Linear multiple regression was used to determine the interactive effects of subjective religiosity and reported police abuse on Black American adolescent boys. Higher reports of subjective religiosity were associated with lower depressive symptomatology. Reports of police abuse were associated with lower public regard beliefs (belief that society views Black Americans less favorably). Results highlight the impact experiencing police abuse has on Black adolescent boys and we conclude with implications, areas for future research and intervention points. View Full-Text
Keywords: police abuse; public regard; religiosity; black male adolescents police abuse; public regard; religiosity; black male adolescents
MDPI and ACS Style

Jackson, A.N.; Butler-Barnes, S.T.; Stafford, J.D.; Robinson, H.; Allen, P.C. “Can I Live”: Black American Adolescent Boys’ Reports of Police Abuse and the Role of Religiosity on Mental Health. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 4330.

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