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Review

Evidences from Clinical Trials in Down Syndrome: Diet, Exercise and Body Composition

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Division of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Department of Agrochemistry and Biochemistry, Faculty of Sciences, University of Alicante, 03690 Alicante, Spain
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Applied Biochemistry Research Group AppBiochem, University of Alicante, 03690 Alicante, Spain
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Department of Mathematics, Faculty of Sciences, University of Alicante, 03690 Alicante, Spain
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Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Atacama, Avda. Copayapu 2862, III Region, Copiapó 1530000, Chile
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Noncommunicable Diseases Research Group, Atacama 1410000, Chile
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(12), 4294; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17124294
Received: 29 April 2020 / Revised: 8 June 2020 / Accepted: 9 June 2020 / Published: 16 June 2020
Down syndrome (DS) is related to diseases like congenital heart disease, obstructive sleep apnea, obesity and overweight. Studies focused on DS associated with obesity and overweight are still scarce. The main objective of this work was to analyze the relationship between dietary intervention, physical exercise and body composition, in DS with overweight and obesity. This review is based on the PRISMA guidelines (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic reviews and Meta-Analyses). Selection criteria for this analysis were: publications between January 1997 and December 2019; DS individuals with overweight and obesity; clinical trials using dietary intervention and physical exercise paying attention to changes in body composition. Selected clinical trials were focused on an exclusive intervention based on physical exercise. The anthropometric measures analyzed were body fat, BMI, waist circumference, body weight and fat free mass. The main conclusion is that prescribing structured physical exercise intervention may be related to a greater variation in body composition. Despite limited number of clinical trials analyzed, it can be assumed that the reported studies have not achieved optimal results and that the design of future clinical trials should be improved. Some guidelines are proposed to contribute to the improvement of knowledge in this field. View Full-Text
Keywords: Down’s syndrome; obesity; overweight; diet; exercise and body composition Down’s syndrome; obesity; overweight; diet; exercise and body composition
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MDPI and ACS Style

Martínez-Espinosa, R.M.; Molina Vila, M.D.; Reig García-Galbis, M. Evidences from Clinical Trials in Down Syndrome: Diet, Exercise and Body Composition. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 4294. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17124294

AMA Style

Martínez-Espinosa RM, Molina Vila MD, Reig García-Galbis M. Evidences from Clinical Trials in Down Syndrome: Diet, Exercise and Body Composition. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2020; 17(12):4294. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17124294

Chicago/Turabian Style

Martínez-Espinosa, Rosa M., Mariola D. Molina Vila, and Manuel Reig García-Galbis. 2020. "Evidences from Clinical Trials in Down Syndrome: Diet, Exercise and Body Composition" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 17, no. 12: 4294. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17124294

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