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Open AccessArticle

The Association between Noise Exposure and Metabolic Syndrome: A Longitudinal Cohort Study in Taiwan

1
Research Center for Humanities and Social Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taipei 100029, Taiwan
2
Institute of Public Health, School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei 11221, Taiwan
3
Institute of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei 11221, Taiwan
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(12), 4236; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17124236
Received: 27 May 2020 / Revised: 12 June 2020 / Accepted: 12 June 2020 / Published: 14 June 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Health Inequality and Spatially Distribution)
Metabolic syndrome is becoming more common worldwide. Studies suggest environmental pollution, including traffic noise, might be linked with metabolic syndrome. This study sought to evaluate how noise exposure is linked to the development of metabolic syndrome and its components in Taiwan. Using data from a cohort of 42,509 participants and Cox proportional hazards regression models, the effects of noise exposure on metabolic syndrome and its components were quantified. After adjustment for covariates (age, gender, body mass index, and physical activity), the hazard ratio for metabolic syndrome was 1.13 (95% CI: 1.04–1.22) for medium noise exposure and 1.24 (95% CI: 1.13–1.36) for high noise exposure. Noise exposure was also positively associated with all of metabolic syndrome’s components. This finding suggests noise exposure might contribute to metabolic syndrome and its components. Policies aiming to reduce noise pollution might reduce the risks of metabolic syndrome and its components. View Full-Text
Keywords: noise exposure; human perception; metabolic syndrome; hazard ratio noise exposure; human perception; metabolic syndrome; hazard ratio
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Huang, T.; Chan, T.-C.; Huang, Y.-J.; Pan, W.-C. The Association between Noise Exposure and Metabolic Syndrome: A Longitudinal Cohort Study in Taiwan. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 4236.

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