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Longitudinal Analysis of Work-to-Family Conflict and Self-Reported General Health among Working Parents in Germany

Department of Health Monitoring and Reporting, Robert Koch Institute, Nordufer 20, Berlin 13353, Germany
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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(11), 3966; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17113966
Received: 1 April 2020 / Revised: 30 May 2020 / Accepted: 31 May 2020 / Published: 3 June 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Stress and Work)
The combination of work and family roles can lead to work-to-family conflict (WTFC), which may have consequences for the parents’ health. We examined the association between WTFC and self-reported general health among working parents in Germany over time. Data were drawn from wave 6 (2013) and wave 8 (2015) of the German family and relationship panel. It included working persons living together with at least one child in the household (791 mothers and 723 fathers). Using logistic regressions, we estimated the longitudinal effects of WTFC in wave 6 and 8 on self-reported general health in wave 8. Moderating effects of education were also considered. The odds ratio for poor self-reported general health for mothers who developed WTFC in wave 8 compared to mothers who never reported conflicts was 2.4 (95% CI: 1.54–3.68). For fathers with newly emerged WTFC in wave 8, the odds ratio was 1.8 (95% CI: 1.03–3.04). Interactions of WTFC with low education showed no significant effects on self-reported general health, although tendencies show that fathers with lower education are more affected. It remains to be discussed how health-related consequences of WTFC can be reduced e.g., through workplace interventions and reconciliation policies. View Full-Text
Keywords: work-to-family conflicts; self-reported general health; education; pairfam; longitudinal analysis; logistic regression; moderator analysis; predictive margins; Germany work-to-family conflicts; self-reported general health; education; pairfam; longitudinal analysis; logistic regression; moderator analysis; predictive margins; Germany
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Borgmann, L.-S.; Rattay, P.; Lampert, T. Longitudinal Analysis of Work-to-Family Conflict and Self-Reported General Health among Working Parents in Germany. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 3966.

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