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Once Resin Composites and Dental Sealants Release Bisphenol-A, How Might This Affect Our Clinical Management?—A Systematic Review

1
Institute of Integrated Clinical Practice, Institute for Clinical and Biomedical Research (iCBR), area of Environment Genetics and Oncobiology (CIMAGO), CNC.IBILI, Faculty of Medicine, University of Coimbra, 3000-075 Coimbra, Portugal
2
Institute of Integrated Clinical Practice, Faculty of Medicine, University of Coimbra, 3000-075 Coimbra, Portugal
3
Institute of Endodontics, Institute for Clinical and Biomedical Research (iCBR), area of Environment Genetics and Oncobiology (CIMAGO), CNC.IBILI, Faculty of Medicine, University of Coimbra, 3000-075 Coimbra, Portugal
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(9), 1627; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16091627
Received: 26 March 2019 / Revised: 22 April 2019 / Accepted: 3 May 2019 / Published: 9 May 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Impact of Environmental Levels of Bisphenol A on Health)
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Abstract

(1) Background: Bisphenol A (BPA) based dental resins are commonly used in preventive and reparative dentistry. Since some monomers may remain unpolymerized in the application of dental resin, they dissolve in the saliva. (2) Methods: The literature search was carried out in Pubmed, Cochrane and Embase databases. Randomized controlled trials, cohort studies and case-control studies that evaluated BPA levels in human urine, saliva and/or blood were included. (3) Results: The initial search had 5111 results. A total of 20 studies were included in the systematic review. Most studies showed an increase of the levels of bisphenol A 1 h after treatments with composite resins and dental sealants. One week after treatments the levels were decreased. (4) Conclusions: Some clinical precautions should be taken to decrease the release of BPA, namely the use of rubber dam, the immediate polishing of all resins used, or the use of glycerin gel to avoid non-polymerization of the last resin layer, and mouthwash after treatment. Another preventive measure in addition to the above-mentioned is the use of the smallest possible number of restorations or sealants, a maximum of four per appointment. These measures are even more important in children, adolescents and pregnant women. View Full-Text
Keywords: bisphenol A; dental sealants; endocrine disruptor; environmental levels; exposure; monomers; prevention; resin composites bisphenol A; dental sealants; endocrine disruptor; environmental levels; exposure; monomers; prevention; resin composites
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Paula, A.B.; Toste, D.; Marinho, A.; Amaro, I.; Marto, C.-M.; Coelho, A.; Marques-Ferreira, M.; Carrilho, E. Once Resin Composites and Dental Sealants Release Bisphenol-A, How Might This Affect Our Clinical Management?—A Systematic Review. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16, 1627.

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