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Exploring Food Access and Sociodemographic Correlates of Food Consumption and Food Insecurity in Zanzibari Households

1
Leibniz Institute for Prevention Research and Epidemiology—BIPS, 28359 Bremen, Germany
2
Center for Biomolecular Interactions Bremen, University Bremen, 28334 Bremen, Germany
3
Environmental Analytical Chemistry and Eco-toxicology, Zanzibar State University, P.O. Box 146 Unguja, Zanzibar
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
These authors contributed equally to the work.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(9), 1557; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16091557
Received: 25 February 2019 / Revised: 29 April 2019 / Accepted: 1 May 2019 / Published: 4 May 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Towards More Sustainable Food Systems)
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Abstract

Rapid growth of the Zanzibari population and urbanization are expected to impact food insecurity and malnutrition in Zanzibar. This study explored the relationship between food access (FA) and sociodemographic correlates with food consumption score and food insecurity experience scale. Based on cross-sectional data of 196 randomly selected households, we first investigated the association between sociodemographic correlates and Food Consumption Score (FCS) and Food Insecurity Experience Scale using multilevel Poisson regression. Secondly, the role of FA in these associations was investigated by interaction with the respective correlates. About 65% of households had poor food consumption, and 32% were severely food-insecure. Poor FA was more prevalent in households with poor food consumption (71%). Polygamous households and larger households had a higher chance for severe food insecurity. In the interaction with FA, only larger households with poor FA showed a higher chance for severe food insecurity. In households having no vehicle, good FA increased the chance of having acceptable FCS compared to poor FA. By contrast, urban households with good FA had a twofold chance of acceptable FCS compared to rural household with poor FA. Poor FA, poor food consumption and food insecurity are challenging; hence, facilitating households’ FA may improve the population’s nutrition situation. View Full-Text
Keywords: demographic correlates; food access; household; food insecurity experience scale; Zanzibar; sub-Saharan Africa demographic correlates; food access; household; food insecurity experience scale; Zanzibar; sub-Saharan Africa
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).
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Nyangasa, M.A.; Buck, C.; Kelm, S.; Sheikh, M.; Hebestreit, A. Exploring Food Access and Sociodemographic Correlates of Food Consumption and Food Insecurity in Zanzibari Households. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16, 1557.

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