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The Association of Physical Activity and Sedentary Behaviors with Upper Respiratory Tract Infections and Sleep Duration in Preschool Children—Study Protocol

1
Department of Pediatric Pulmonology and Allergy, Medical University of Warsaw, Żwirki i Wigury 63A, 02-091 Warszawa, Poland
2
Department of Didactics of Physical Activity, Poznan University of Physical Education, Królowej Jadwigi 27/39, 61-871 Poznań, Poland
3
Department of Education and Research in Health Sciences, Medical University of Warsaw, Żwirki i Wigury 81, 02-091 Warszawa, Poland
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(9), 1496; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16091496
Received: 25 February 2019 / Revised: 24 April 2019 / Accepted: 25 April 2019 / Published: 27 April 2019
(This article belongs to the Section Health Behavior, Chronic Disease and Health Promotion)
Currently, there is no consensus regarding the benefits of physical activity in terms of upper respiratory tract infections (URTIs) among different age groups of children. The number of school students avoiding physical education is on the rise. Children of all ages spend more time on sedentary behavior, eat less nutritious food and spend less time sleeping. All of these concomitant aspects adversely affect the immune system. A coexisting problem of a growing society is a large number of URTIs which is the main reason for general practitioner intervention. The aim of this study is to determine whether there is a correlation between the frequency of respiratory tract infections and the level of physical exercise in a cohort of pre-school children. This will be a cross-sectional, short-term study conducted on a single study population. We aim to recruit four-, to seven-year-old children who will be receiving activity monitoring devices for 24 h a day for 40 days. Daily step count, mean intensity of physical exercise and sleep duration will be measured. Simultaneously, their parents will receive a series of 60 questionnaires, one questionnaire per day, for the daily assessment of upper respiratory infection (URI) symptoms. Our study conducted on a cohort of healthy pre-school children using uniform tools, aims to scientifically establish and quantify the relationship between physical activity and health outcomes over a specified period of time. View Full-Text
Keywords: upper respiratory infections; pre-school children; physical activity; immune function; sedentary behaviors; sleeping habits upper respiratory infections; pre-school children; physical activity; immune function; sedentary behaviors; sleeping habits
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Ostrzyżek-Przeździecka, K.; Smeding, C.; Bronikowski, M.; Panczyk, M.; Feleszko, W. The Association of Physical Activity and Sedentary Behaviors with Upper Respiratory Tract Infections and Sleep Duration in Preschool Children—Study Protocol. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16, 1496.

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