Next Article in Journal
Relation between Psychological Restorativeness and Lifestyle, Quality of Life, Resilience, and Stress-Coping in Forest Settings
Next Article in Special Issue
Space–Time Relationship between Short-Term Exposure to Fine and Coarse Particles and Mortality in a Nationwide Analysis of Korea: A Bayesian Hierarchical Spatio-Temporal Model
Previous Article in Journal
Built Environment and Health Behaviors: Deconstructing the Black Box of Interactions—A Review of Reviews
Previous Article in Special Issue
Spatially Filtered Multilevel Analysis on Spatial Determinants for Malaria Occurrence in Korea
Article

Spatial Analysis of Built Environment Risk for Respiratory Health and Its Implication for Urban Planning: A Case Study of Shanghai

1
College of Architecture and Urban Planning, Tongji University, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092, China
2
Shanghai Center for Disease Prevention and Control, Shanghai 200336, China
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(8), 1455; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16081455
Received: 17 February 2019 / Revised: 10 April 2019 / Accepted: 20 April 2019 / Published: 24 April 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Time-Space Modeling of the Health Effects of Environment)
Urban planning has been proven and is expected to promote public health by improving the built environment. With a focus on respiratory health, this paper explores the impact of the built environment on the incidence of lung cancer and its planning implications. While the occurrence of lung cancer is a complicated and cumulative process, it would be valuable to discover the potential risks of the built environment. Based on the data of 52,009 lung cancer cases in Shanghai, China from 2009 to 2013, this paper adopts spatial analytical methods to unravel the spatial distribution of lung cancer cases. With the assistance of geographic information system and Geo-Detector, this paper identifies certain built environments that are correlated with the distribution pattern of lung cancer cases in Shanghai, including the percentage of industrial land (which explains 28% of the cases), location factors (11%), and the percentages of cultivated land and green space (6% and 5%, respectively). Based on the quantitative study, this paper facilitates additional consideration and planning intervention measures for respiratory health such as green buffering. It is an ecological study to illustrate correlation that provides approaches for further study to unravel the causality of disease incidence and the built environment. View Full-Text
Keywords: built environment; respiratory health; spatial analysis; geographical detector; urban planning built environment; respiratory health; spatial analysis; geographical detector; urban planning
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Wang, L.; Sun, W.; Zhou, K.; Zhang, M.; Bao, P. Spatial Analysis of Built Environment Risk for Respiratory Health and Its Implication for Urban Planning: A Case Study of Shanghai. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16, 1455. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16081455

AMA Style

Wang L, Sun W, Zhou K, Zhang M, Bao P. Spatial Analysis of Built Environment Risk for Respiratory Health and Its Implication for Urban Planning: A Case Study of Shanghai. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2019; 16(8):1455. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16081455

Chicago/Turabian Style

Wang, Lan, Wenyao Sun, Kaichen Zhou, Minlu Zhang, and Pingping Bao. 2019. "Spatial Analysis of Built Environment Risk for Respiratory Health and Its Implication for Urban Planning: A Case Study of Shanghai" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 16, no. 8: 1455. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16081455

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop