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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(8), 1391; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16081391

Modeling the Impact of an Indoor Air Filter on Air Pollution Exposure Reduction and Associated Mortality in Urban Delhi Household

1
Department of Environmental Health, Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, Atlanta, GA 30322, USA
2
Environmental Health Sciences, School of Public Health, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Both authors contributed equally to the study.
Received: 21 March 2019 / Revised: 13 April 2019 / Accepted: 14 April 2019 / Published: 17 April 2019
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Abstract

Indoor exposure to fine particulate matter (PM2.5) is a prominent health concern. However, few studies have examined the effectiveness of long-term use of indoor air filters for reduction of PM2.5 exposure and associated decrease in adverse health impacts in urban India. We conducted 20 simulations of yearlong personal exposure to PM2.5 in urban Delhi using the National Institute of Standards and Technology’s CONTAM program (NIST, Gaithersburg, MD, USA). Simulation scenarios were developed to examine different air filter efficiencies, use schedules, and the influence of a smoker at home. We quantified associated mortality reductions with Household Air Pollution Intervention Tool (HAPIT, University of California, Berkeley, CA, USA). Without an air filter, we estimated an annual mean PM2.5 personal exposure of 103 µg/m3 (95% Confidence Interval (CI): 93, 112) and 137 µg/m3 (95% CI: 125, 149) for households without and with a smoker, respectively. All day use of a high-efficiency particle air (HEPA) filter would reduce personal PM2.5 exposure to 29 µg/m3 and 30 µg/m3, respectively. The reduced personal PM2.5 exposure from air filter use is associated with 8–37% reduction in mortality attributable to PM2.5 pollution in Delhi. The findings of this study indicate that air filter may provide significant improvements in indoor air quality and result in health benefits. View Full-Text
Keywords: fine particulate matters (PM2.5); air filter; indoor air quality; CONTAM program; air exchange rate; health impact fine particulate matters (PM2.5); air filter; indoor air quality; CONTAM program; air exchange rate; health impact
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Liao, J.; Ye, W.; Pillarisetti, A.; Clasen, T.F. Modeling the Impact of an Indoor Air Filter on Air Pollution Exposure Reduction and Associated Mortality in Urban Delhi Household. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16, 1391.

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