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Article

Compliance with Multiple Health Behaviour Recommendations: A Cross-Sectional Comparison between Female Cancer Survivors and Those with no Cancer History

1
School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, Newcastle, NSW 2308, Australia
2
College of Health Sciences, Mekelle University, Mekelle 046, Ethiopia
3
Hunter Medical Research Institute, Kookaburra Circuit, New Lambton Heights, Newcastle, NSW 2305, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(8), 1345; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16081345
Received: 23 February 2019 / Revised: 2 April 2019 / Accepted: 3 April 2019 / Published: 15 April 2019
(This article belongs to the Collection Health Behaviors, Risk Factors, NCDs and Health Promotion)
Lifestyle behaviours have an important role in preventing cancer, reducing treatment side effects, and improving survival and quality of life for cancer survivors. This study investigated adherence to multiple lifestyle behaviours among women with and without a cancer history. From the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women’s Health (ALSWH) surveys, 2407 cancer survivors and 3896 controls (cancer free population) were identified. Based on the World Cancer Research Fund/American Institute for Cancer Research (WCRF/AICR) recommendations, adherence to six health behaviours (smoking, physical activity, fruit and vegetable intake, alcohol consumption, sugary drink intake, and Body Mass Index [BMI]) were assessed. Overall adherence was low, and there were no differences between survivors and controls on adherence to any of the six individual health behaviours. However, both recent and long-term cancer survivors were more likely than controls to adhere to multiple health behaviours (p < 0.05). When participants with melanoma or non-melanoma skin cancer were excluded, adherence was less likely (but not significant) in the cancer group than controls. Higher education (p < 0.01), being married (p < 0.01), and lower comorbidity of chronic illnesses (p < 0.01) were significantly associated with adherence to multiple lifestyle behaviours. Overall, the findings suggest that a cancer diagnosis may result in increased compliance with multiple health behaviour guidelines. View Full-Text
Keywords: multiple health behaviours; adherence; cancer survivors; ALSWH multiple health behaviours; adherence; cancer survivors; ALSWH
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MDPI and ACS Style

Tollosa, D.N.; Tavener, M.; Hure, A.; James, E.L. Compliance with Multiple Health Behaviour Recommendations: A Cross-Sectional Comparison between Female Cancer Survivors and Those with no Cancer History. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16, 1345. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16081345

AMA Style

Tollosa DN, Tavener M, Hure A, James EL. Compliance with Multiple Health Behaviour Recommendations: A Cross-Sectional Comparison between Female Cancer Survivors and Those with no Cancer History. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2019; 16(8):1345. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16081345

Chicago/Turabian Style

Tollosa, Daniel N., Meredith Tavener, Alexis Hure, and Erica L. James. 2019. "Compliance with Multiple Health Behaviour Recommendations: A Cross-Sectional Comparison between Female Cancer Survivors and Those with no Cancer History" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 16, no. 8: 1345. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16081345

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