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Open AccessArticle

Between Privilege and Oppression: An Intersectional Analysis of Active Transportation Experiences Among Washington D.C. Area Youth

1
Department of Kinesiology, School of Public Health, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742, USA
2
Active Living Laboratory, School of Physical Education Sport and Exercise Sciences, University of Otago, Dunedin 9054, New Zealand
3
Department of Behavioral and Community Health, School of Public Health, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742, USA
4
Center for Geospatial Information Science, Department of Geographical Sciences, College of Behavioral and Social Sciences, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742, USA
5
Department of Sociology, College of Behavioral and Social Sciences, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(8), 1313; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16081313
Received: 22 February 2019 / Revised: 1 April 2019 / Accepted: 9 April 2019 / Published: 12 April 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Health Inequalities in Children)
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Abstract

The use of active transportation (AT), such as walking, cycling, or even public transit, as a means of transport offers an opportunity to increase youth physical activity and improve health. Despite the well-known benefits of AT, there are environmental and social variables that converge on the AT experiences of low-income youth and youth of color (YOC) that have yet to be fully uncovered. This study uses an intersectional framework, largely focusing on the race-gender-class trinity, to examine youth AT within a context of transportation inequity. Theoretically guided by the Ecological Model of Active Transportation, focus groups were completed with two groups of girls (15 participants) and two groups of boys (nine participants) ranging between the ages of 12–15 years who lived within the Washington D.C. area. This research found race, gender, and class to be inhibitors of AT for both boys and girls, but with more pronounced negative influences on girls. View Full-Text
Keywords: active transportation; PEAT Study; transportation inequity; youth of color active transportation; PEAT Study; transportation inequity; youth of color
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Roberts, J.D.; Mandic, S.; Fryer, C.S.; Brachman, M.L.; Ray, R. Between Privilege and Oppression: An Intersectional Analysis of Active Transportation Experiences Among Washington D.C. Area Youth. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16, 1313.

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